uninhabited


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un·in·hab·it·ed

 (ŭn′ĭn-hăb′ĭ-tĭd)
adj.
Having no residents; not inhabited.

uninhabited

(ˌʌnɪnˈhæbɪtɪd)
adj
(of a place) not having inhabitants: an uninhabited island.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.uninhabited - not having inhabitantsuninhabited - not having inhabitants; not lived in; "an uninhabited island"; "gaping doors of uninhabited houses"
inhabited - having inhabitants; lived in; "the inhabited regions of the earth"

uninhabited

adjective deserted, waste, barren, desolate, abandoned, empty, desert, lonely, unsettled, vacant, unoccupied, unpopulated, untenanted an uninhabited island in the North Pacific

uninhabited

adjective
Not spoken for or occupied:
Translations
neobydlený
ubeboet
asumaton
nenastanjen
人の住んでいない
사람이 살지 않는
nenaseljen
obebodd
ไม่มีคนอาศัยอยู่
không có người ở

uninhabited

[ˈʌnɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] ADJ (= deserted) → desierto, despoblado; [house] → desocupado

uninhabited

[ˌʌnɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] adjinhabité(e)

uninhabited

adjunbewohnt

uninhabited

[ˌʌnɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] adj (house) → disabitato/a; (island) → deserto/a

uninhabited

غَيْرُ مَسْكُون neobydlený ubeboet unbewohnt ακατοίκητος inhabitado asumaton inhabité nenastanjen disabitato 人の住んでいない 사람이 살지 않는 onbewoond ubebodd niezamieszkały desabitado, inabitado необитаемый obebodd ไม่มีคนอาศัยอยู่ meskun olmayan không có người ở 杳无人迹的
References in classic literature ?
For who does not know Robinson Crusoe, or, as the first title ran, "The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner, who lived eight-and-twenty years all alone in an uninhabited Island on the Coast of America near the Mouth of the great River Oroonoque, having been cast on shore by shipwreck, wherein all the men perished but himself.
About half a mile from the palace in which they lived there stood a castle, which was uninhabited and almost a ruin, but the garden which surrounded it was a mass of blooming flowers, and in this garden the youngest Princess used often to walk.
There happened nothing remarkable to us till the last night of our journey, when taking up our lodging at a place belonging to the Empress, a declared enemy to all Catholics, and in particular to the missionaries, we met with a kind reception in appearance, and were lodged in a large stone house covered with wood and straw, which had stood uninhabited so long, that great numbers of red ants had taken possession of it; these, as soon as we were laid down, attacked us on all sides, and tormented us so incessantly that we were obliged to call up our domestics.
Well, my friend, this earth will one day be that cold corpse; it will become uninhabitable and uninhabited like the moon, which has long since lost all its vital heat.
It was a ring of land round a deep lagoon, uninhabited, and covered only with scrub and wild guava.
And every morning, perched on our stays, rows of these birds were seen; and spite of our hootings, for a long time obstinately clung to the hemp, as though they deemed our ship some drifting, uninhabited craft; a thing appointed to desolation, and therefore fit roosting-place for their homeless selves.
We set sail with the first favourable wind, and after a long voyage upon the open seas we landed upon an unknown island which proved to be uninhabited.
As the incubator had been placed far north of their own territory in a supposedly uninhabited and unfrequented area, we had before us a tremendous journey, concerning which I, of course, knew nothing.
Between the Union Pacific road and the branch which unites Kearney with Saint Joseph it formed a great uninhabited island.
These valleys must form the grand points of commencement of the future settlement of the country; but there must be many such, en folded in the embraces of these lower ranges of mountains; which, though at present they lie waste and uninhabited, and to the eye of the trader and trapper, present but barren wastes, would, in the hands of skilful agriculturists and husbandmen, soon assume a different aspect, and teem with waving crops, or be covered with flocks and herds.
The sea-reach of the Thames is straight, and, once Sheerness is left behind, its banks seem very uninhabited, except for the cluster of houses which is Southend, or here and there a lonely wooden jetty where petroleum ships discharge their dangerous cargoes, and the oil-storage tanks, low and round with slightly-domed roofs, peep over the edge of the fore-shore, as it were a village of Central African huts imitated in iron.
The herbage is parched and withered; the brooks and streams are dried up; the buffalo, the elk and the deer have wandered to distant parts, keeping within the verge of expiring verdure, and leaving behind them a vast uninhabited solitude, seamed by ravines, the beds of former torrents, but now serving only to tantalize and increase the thirst of the traveller.