uninterest


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un·in·ter·est

 (ŭn-ĭn′trĭst, -tər-ĭst, -trĕst′)
n.
Lack of interest or concern; indifference.

uninterest

(ʌnˈɪntrəst; ʌnˈɪntərɛst)
n
no interest or a lack of interest
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References in classic literature ?
Bennett looked at him with the triple-ringed uninterest of the creed that lumps nine-tenths of the world under the title of 'heathen'.
The ex-attorney-general's uninterest in sparing Montreal-based SNC-Lavalin from prosecution is already playing worse in the firm's home province than elsewhere in the country.
All this has built into a level of humanitarian uninterest and "unconcern" that calls to mind parallels from pre-war Europe.
As the author argues: "The frayed relationship with White Rock was almost certainly a factor contributing to Blaine's relative uninterest in the war and specifically the Canadian war effort" (p.
As some Mennonites and Brethren in Christ grew discouraged with the uninterest of neo-evangelicals in their peace message, Hostetter--who held clout with Anabaptists by virtue of his role with M.C.C.--emphasized the importance of continued dialogue.
Adam Smith held that native Americans' uninterest in accumulation only changed with the arrival of Europeans 'with whom they now exchange their surplus peltry, for blankets, fire-arms, and brandy, which gives it some value'.
The island mirrors the uninterest in transformation effected in its
But Phillips also suggests that "getting it, as a project or a supposed achievement, can itself sometimes be an avoidance; an avoidance, say, of our solitariness or our singularity or our unhostile interest and uninterest in other people" (57).
In particular he was struck by the uninterest of American economists in real society and real people.
After years of uninterest, South Africa is starting to gear up for a move towards renewable energy and many projects are in the pipeline.
He writes: "While the child's boredom is often recognized as an incapacity, it is usually denied as an opportunity." (491) What new possibilities might boredom bring to the bored child, Phillips asks, if parents were to make room for his uninterest? Moreover, one might ask, what could the parents gain from opening their eyes to the child's lack of desire?
On the other hand, if nonresponses bear no relation to de facto risk screening and are merely a product of commercial decisions, uninterest, or disorganization, then nonresponses cannot be regarded as evidence of a functioning regulatory system.