uniqueness


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u·nique

 (yo͞o-nēk′)
adj.
1. Being the only one of its kind: the unique existing example of Donne's handwriting.
2. Characteristic only of a particular category or entity: a weather pattern that is unique to coastal areas.
3. Remarkable; extraordinary: a unique opportunity to buy a house.

[French, from Old French, from Latin ūnicus; see oi-no- in Indo-European roots.]

u·nique′ly adv.
u·nique′ness n.
Usage Note: Unique may be the foremost example of an absolute term—a term that, in the eyes of traditional grammarians, should not allow comparison or modification by an adverb of degree like very, somewhat, or quite. Thus, most grammarians believe that it is incorrect to say that something is very unique or more unique than something else, though phrases such as nearly unique and almost unique are presumably acceptable, since in these cases unique is not modified by an adverb of degree. A substantial majority of the Usage Panel supports the traditional view. In our 2004 survey, 66 percent of the Panelists disapproved of the sentence Her designs are quite unique in today's fashion, although in our 1988 survey, 80 percent rejected this same sentence, suggesting that resistance to this usage may be waning. · In fact, the nontraditional modification of unique may be found in the work of many reputable writers and has certainly been put to effective use: "I am in the rather unique position of being the son, the grandson, and the great-grandson of preachers" (Martin Luther King, Jr.)."The creature is so unique in its style and appearance that the biologists who discovered it have given it not just its own species name ... but have moved way up the classification scale and declared that it is an entirely new phylum" (Natalie Angier). See Usage Notes at absolute, equal.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.uniqueness - the quality of being one of a kinduniqueness - the quality of being one of a kind; "that singularity distinguished him from all his companions"
individualism, individuality, individuation - the quality of being individual; "so absorbed by the movement that she lost all sense of individuality"

uniqueness

noun
The quality or condition of being unique:
Translations

uniqueness

[juːˈniːknɪs] Nsingularidad f

uniqueness

[juːˈniːknɪs] n (= singularity) → singularité funique selling point nargument m clé de vente

uniqueness

uniqueness

[juːˈniːknɪs] nsingolarità, unicità
References in classic literature ?
For though the harpooneers, with the great body of the crew, were a far more barbaric, heathenish, and motley set than any of the tame merchant-ship companies which my previous experiences had made me acquainted with, still I ascribed this --and rightly ascribed it --to the fierce uniqueness of the very nature of that wild Scandinavian vocation in which I had so abandonedly embarked.
Tudor had always been a wanderer, and with facile wit and quick vivid description he leaped from episode and place to episode and place, relating his experiences seemingly not because they were his, but for the sake of their bizarreness and uniqueness, for the unusual incident or the laughable situation.
It was just such uniqueness of points of view that startled Ruth.
There is another point, besides lack of universality and necessity, which it is important to realize as regards causes in the above sense, and that is the lack of uniqueness.
Need', yet again, is brought about by the uniqueness for the existence of a Nation State.
Hence, uniqueness denotes an absolute condition; none like you, before and after you.
Our products sophistication, uniqueness - hope the cafe a relaxing customers The first 20 shoppers through the doors will also receive a gift card with a value between PS5 and PS100.
Uniqueness and Metaepistemology, DANIEL GRECO and BRIAN HEDDEN
Summary: 'We need to take pride in our own uniqueness,' says actress at Women Economic Forum 2017
A related issue that has received little scholarly attention is whether being primed with the psychological concept of money or wealth affects individuals' need for uniqueness.
Using a convenience sample of college students, participants with and without tattoos were compared on measures of body appreciation, self-esteem, and need for uniqueness.
Among the topics are men in nursing, the uniqueness of adult nursing, the uniqueness of learning disability nursing, applying for a nursing, program, life in university, securing your first job as a nurse, and embarking on a journey of lifelong learning.