unironic

unironic

(ˌʌnaɪˈrɒnɪk)
adj
not ironic
References in periodicals archive ?
Here this template is filled with implicit ideas of a blond-haired, blue-eyed hero, a physical feature that becomes the unironic ideal of beauty, courtliness, and knighthood.
For a twenty-first-century (post)modernist poet, Kaminsky is surprisingly unironic. His success with US readers is certainly connected with his ability to tap into existing ideas about "Russianness." At least since the time of Melchior deVogue's book Le roman russe (1886), Russian literature has spellbound Western audiences with an exoticized notion of raw emotional power and charismatic spirituality.
The downside of the unironic approach is that it requires the engineer to arbitrarily assign costs to objectives such as pollution [Pelster].
That story centers on Mark's relationship with several women who serve as inspiration for the female denizens of Marwen ("dolls," as Hogie calls them, in an unironic borrowing from the lingo of 1940s and 1950s war movies).
I've just got a bit more Turner thrown in.' Nevertheless, her unironic interest in the Old Masters and her refined painterly technique were viewed as old fashioned by many of her peers, and Brown jumped at the first opportunity to leave London.
Surely, this resistance is in itself psychologically justified, because it becomes bound up with catastrophe-induced trauma, what the survivors of Zone One refer to as "PASD" (Post-Apocalyptic Stress Disorder, a not entirely unironic label).
To know that and yet to pursue unironic ideas about our collective condition--despite all current political, social, and theoretical factors--is a profound act of faith in art.
The statue is not unironic, for in spite of this leader's legendary self-effacing humility, the statue is massive and stands on a huge granite plinth, adding a triumphantilist element to the way in which the statue memorialises him.
Beer in the context of Lewis Carroll's juvenilia also points to a poem by his brother Wilfred, "Blood," published in the family magazine Mischmasch (1855-1862) and describes it as "a rip-roaring and unironic celebration of violence" (p.
Yiddish literature is often caricatured as being either tragic or comic, or both at once; according to the stereotype, Yiddish is not the native language of unironic joy.
It is not entirely unironic that, among the accomplishments she is most proud of in her career, Sevketoglu lists the staffing of pretty much all of the Turkish Cypriot archaeology staff working on the Committee of Missing Persons (CMP) -- the very model for bicommunal co-operation in the service of a higher purpose.
An unironic appreciation for fast food and lowbrow fiction won't catch the eye of a Stanford admissions officer.