unit rule

Related to unit rule: superdelegate

unit rule

n.
A rule of procedure at a national political convention under which a state's entire vote must be cast for the candidate preferred by a majority of the state's delegates.

u′nit rule`


n.
(in a national political convention) a rule whereby a state delegation votes as a unit, not recognizing minority votes within the delegation.
[1880–85, Amer.]
References in periodicals archive ?
The owner's claim that the unit rule requires a determination based upon a uniform square-foot valuation misapplies the unit rule in this case.
Normally, the "unit rule" prohibits part of a case from being expunged if the individual was found guilty of any of the offenses.
It's claimed the new 50p per unit rule will save PS1billion over 10 years through fewer hospital admissions and arrests.
Thus, this Court held that the taxability of a non-domiciliary taxpayer's out-of-state business turned on the application of the "unit rule" or the unitary business principle--on whether the out-of-state income sought to be taxed was "unitary" with, or functionally related to, the taxpayer's in-state activities.
In a more helpful vein, the 8823 Guide states that limited violations of the Available Unit Rule at 100 percent occupied low-income properties (e.g., an over-income household is moved in) can be considered de minimis, and thus not place credits at risk, if the manager can show that appropriate policies and procedures are in place and that due diligence was conducted to ensure violations would not occur.
The Democrats did away with the so-called unit rule, wherein a state's entire delegation would vote in unison for one candidate, as determined by a majority of the delegation.
Listeners were reminded of the importance of following the Yellow Book on such items as the determination of the larger parcel, the before-and-after method, the unit rule and highest and best use analysis, which are all clearly spelled out in the document.
The argument is that the general ticket or unit rule, mostly referred to as the winner-take-all principle, implemented during the Jacksonian era in particular works to enlarge the power of the states in presidential elections, and is a vital element in defense of the federative principle.
This has become known as the "unit rule." When it was expedient and most advantageous, majorities in state legislatures decided to start applying the unit rule.
This rule is called the "available unit rule" and is particularly challenging to apply on properties when buildings contain both market-rate and low-income units.
That can still be done with the 21 unit rule - 14 units for women - and I am actually looking forward to it.
When an ACT Unit rule is broken, the type of discipline is discussed among deputies, DHS staff and case managers.