unkingly

unkingly

(ʌnˈkɪŋlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
1. formal not appropriate to a king
2. archaic not like a king
References in periodicals archive ?
He demands recognition of his right to rule while denying his subjects their rights; he wants to be recognized as king despite his unkingly conduct.
(V.iii.151-57) (5) The downward pull of melancholic despair and heavy sin weigh upon King Richard's soul, and manifest quite "unkingly" aspects of sovereign sleep.
Margaret, the foreigner, the adulteress, the man-woman, must always be condemned, and whenever they are seen unkingly in action, so must Henry.
Timling people say that prior to the arrival of the Ghale, the Tamang had their own king who began to act in an unkingly manner by demanding that special foods be provided to him daily and by increasing his labour demands on the people of Timling.
But the resulting effect was to sully the character of King Edward almost irremediably and to create an impression of head-strong selfishness, lust-driven tyranny, willful irresponsibility, and unkingly brutality.
Throughout, Bellabarba has a wealth of comment, always balanced and judicious, on King James himself, who never degenerates into that overblown picture of a besotted and unkingly man; now he becomes the central focus of the fifth chapter which discusses him as the agent of divine justice who earned great praise for his original initiative in pursuing the lesser murderers to trial and execution, but who became a target for criticism when he commuted the death sentences on the Somersets to imprisonment; efforts to justify the agent of divine mercy were much less successful.
The road to Shrewsbury had begun with Richard II's deposition and the squalor of his unkingly death, acts which upset the political cosmology on which royal authority had relied for the delivery of governance and justice, and the obedience of the people.
person to the enemy, all the while indulging in historic and unkingly
Thus, to Mortimer Junior the fact that the king's generosity is based on intimacy rather than public hierarchy means that it is uncontrollable, irresponsible, and unkingly. He expresses this quite precisely in his description of Gaveston as "a night-grown mushrump" (1.4.284), or mushroom.
Loxley argues that the deepest challenges to royalists' poetics came from The Kings Cabinet Opened, the exposure of the king through an annotated text of the king's papers captured at the battle of Naseby in 1645, and by the king's own unkingly escape in disguise and surrender to the Scots in 1646.