unkink

(redirected from unkinking)

un·kink

 (ŭn-kĭngk′)
v. un·kinked, un·kink·ing, un·kinks
v.tr.
To remove kinks from; make straight.
v.intr.
To become relaxed.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

unkink

(ʌnˈkɪŋk)
vb (tr)
informal US to relax the muscular spasm or tightness in (the body or part of the body)
vb (intr)
informal US (of the body or part of the body) to relax after being tight or in spasm
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Stna Knez will teach "Unkinking our Hose" at Sunday's 10 a.m.
Rather it continues to gently fray; a quiet, unremarkable unkinking of fibres.
Previous studies described injecting saline through the catheter, to aid in unkinking the catheter or localizing its position in the patient [5].
This allows for early reduction, unkinking of the critical retinacular vessels and thus restoring the blood supply to the femoral head, all of which may decrease the rates of non-union and avascular necrosis.
New symptoms can include de novo problems with bowel and bladder emptying, discomfort, pressure, or pain; increases in vaginal discharge or odor, or new onset stress UI due to unkinking of an otherwise inadequately supported urethra (Bump, Fantl, & Hurt, 1988).
The flat gave me a chance to spool out a few unkinking casts, rescuing the ten-to-two muscle memory buried by those hours in the car and the long off-season.
* those like ASSESSEES, UNKINKING and REPRESSES in which the two changes involve letters in two different positions in the first/second and second/third trigrams.
Stage 1 (conformational relaxation or unkinking) and stage 2 (intermolecular slippage involving a limited chain length) are not measurable in the following RPA experiments because the relaxation times are orders of magnitude too small to be measurable in a normal manner.