unknight

unknight

(ʌnˈnaɪt)
vb (tr)
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) archaic to take away the status of knighthood from (someone)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
THE last time Crystal Palace won in these parts in the league was when the locals wanted rid of an unknighted Alex Ferguson.
Although the honour would be a slap in the face for fellow Brit Chris Froome -- who A-remains unknighted A-despite winning the Tour de France a remarkable four times.
The unknighted Sean, 40, got the idea for the guitar last month when he heard about Tartan Week and was involved in a race against time after being given the go-ahead to make it for the celebrations.
The city had been managed by a team of departmental directors, but under a new chief executive, the then unknighted Sir David Hens haw, a decision was taken for a slimline executive team.
Its first major achievement came eight years later on the occasion of Alfonso XI's victory on the river Salado, assisted by a considerable contingent of those foreigners who would not have enlisted with an unknighted king or a king who had knighted himself.
Although the honour would be a slap in the face for fellow Brit Chris Froome - who remains unknighted despite winning the Tour a remarkable four times.