unknightly

unknightly

(ʌnˈnaɪtlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
1. archaic not befitting a knight or the knighthood
2. poetic not resembling a knight in character
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Any knight breaking the rules of the tournament, or otherwise transgressing the rules of honourable chivalry, was liable to be stript of his arms, and, having his shield reversed to be placed in that posture astride upon the bars of the palisade, and exposed to public derision, in punishment of his unknightly conduct.
There still faintly beamed from the woman's features something of the freshness, and even the prettiness, of her youth; rendering it probable that the personal charms which Tess could boast of were in main part her mother's gift, and therefore unknightly, unhistorical.
'Ah, miserable and unkind, untrue, Unknightly, traitor-hearted!
"Unknightly Conduct in Sir Launfal" Notes and Queries 15 (1968): 328-29.
Coincidence appears as the norm for those reunions which, far from seeming to conform to a compact narrative block, spring disorderly in different directions, developing hastily into short movements of unresolved crisis within societal order: squires in distress, "unknightly" knights, capricious ladies, knights and ladies "in ioyous iolliment ...
These final, ambivalent encounters of I Henry IV recall on the field of history the defining moment in the tavern when Hal seems honestly on the cusp of a decision about whether to protect Falstaff or turn him over to the watch, until Falstaff abruptly drops flattery and answers the charge of unknightly cowardice by offering to "become a cart" as well as any man.
Roland, having followed them, discovered the murder of Argalia and sought the Moor to punish him for his unknightly deed.
"[R]ich / With jewels, elfin Urim, on the hilt," Excalibur, so long as it is on this side of the great deep, instills a selfish covetousness that threatens Arthur's vision, as Bedivere's unknightly disobedience depicts (The Coming of Arthur, ll.