unleavened bread


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unleavened bread

Bread which is made without a raising agent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unleavened bread - brittle flat bread eaten at Passoverunleavened bread - brittle flat bread eaten at Passover
bread, breadstuff, staff of life - food made from dough of flour or meal and usually raised with yeast or baking powder and then baked
References in classic literature ?
A half-dead fire smoked in the centre of the circle, under an iron plate which held a blackened and burned cake of unleavened bread.
These made unleavened bread, and were foes to the death to fermentation.
Haggis This week I've brought together Scotland's most famous food, haggis and the paratha - an unleavened bread served and eaten by millions every day in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal.
Robert Grant's Unleavened Bread (1900) follows its implacable heroine's eventful social career, which leads her to three different cities and into an equal number of marriages.
Pierogi, dumplings of unleavened bread, originated in which European country?
On its Middle Eastern routes, customers get to enjoy Arabic bread - Markook - a very thin unleavened bread common in the region, and Manakesh which is either topped with Zaatar or Cheese.
The church requires unleavened bread in remembrance of the Last Supper, where the first Eucharist was celebrated at a Passover, according to the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke.
On Passover, Jews around the world eat matzoh -- unleavened bread -- to remember their ancestors who fled ancient Egypt who had no time to wait for the dough to rise.
I missed those little pockets of succulent meats and gooey, melted cheese in their crispy, chewy, crunchy envelopes of unleavened bread that went down well at any time of the day, whether it was for breakfast with a sprinkling of zaatar or with some creamy labneh and a side salad.
The fried papadam, crispy wafers of lentil flour, naan or soft unleavened bread cooked in the tandoor and the bhattura, thick leavened bread make excellent accompaniments.
Within sight of a razor wire fence guarded by Macedonian police, 35-year-old Iraqi migrant Saima Hodep rolls dough with an old steel water pipe outside her tent, in preparation for customers for her unleavened bread.
The holiday is marked by a period of abstinence from leavened food, consumption of unleavened bread, called matzah, and the holding of traditional dinners, called seders.