unleisurely

unleisurely

(ʌnˈlɛʒəlɪ)
adj
jocular not unhurried or relaxed
References in periodicals archive ?
And so, philosophical activity is beneficial to others beyond the bounds of two contemplative friends, without requiring unleisurely efforts to improve the lives of others.
"So if among excellent actions political and military actions are distinguished by nobility and greatness, and these are unleisurely and aim at an end and are not desirable for their own sake,..." (10.7.1177b16-18).
According to Pieper, the Greeks and Romans believed that "we are unleisurely in order to have leisure." This leisure is not just an absence of work, nor is it an inevitable consequence of our free time, such as it is.
But the activity of the virtues appropriate to the political life are not leisurely, and: the action of the statesman is also unleisurely, and--apart from the political action itself--aims at despotic power and honors, or at all events happiness, for him and his fellow citizens--a happiness different from political action, and evidently sought as being different.
Allow me to repeat the passage: But the action of the statesmen is also unleisurely, and--apart from the political action itself--aims at despotic power and honors, or at all events happiness, for him and his fellow citizens--a happiness different from political action, and evidently sought as being different.
Aristotle thus notes that politics and warfare, although they surpass all other actions related to virtue in nobility and grandeur, are still unleisurely since they are for the sake of some end other than themselves and thus cannot be identified with perfect happiness.