unlikeness


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un·like·ness

 (ŭn-līk′nĭs)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being unlike.
2. An instance of unlikeness; a difference. See Synonyms at difference.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unlikeness - dissimilarity evidenced by an absence of likenessunlikeness - dissimilarity evidenced by an absence of likeness
dissimilarity, unsimilarity - the quality of being dissimilar
alikeness, likeness, similitude - similarity in appearance or character or nature between persons or things; "man created God in his own likeness"

unlikeness

noun
References in classic literature ?
Whereas none of the characteristics I have mentioned are peculiar to quality, the fact that likeness and unlikeness can be predicated with reference to quality only, gives to that category its distinctive feature.
Her unlikeness to the rest of them had, by this time, penetrated to Mr.
He saw that others were observing Lydgate's strange unlikeness to himself, and it occurred to him that merely to touch his elbow and call him aside for a moment might rouse him from his absorption.
On the other side of the wall there were the two brothers so like each other in the midst of their unlikeness: Adam with knit brows, shaggy hair, and dark vigorous colour, absorbed in his "figuring"; Seth, with large rugged features, the close copy of his brother's, but with thin, wavy, brown hair and blue dreamy eyes, as often as not looking vaguely out of the window instead of at his book, although it was a newly bought book--Wesley's abridgment of Madame Guyon's life, which was full of wonder and interest for him.
She was very fond of books and solitary rambles; she was not at all shy but she was as sensitive as a flower; and after a time Carlisle people were content to let her live her own life and no longer resented her unlikeness to themselves.
You may imagine that Tom's more and more obvious unlikeness to his father was well fitted to conciliate the maternal aunts and uncles; and Mr.
He cleaves to one person and avoids another, according to their likeness or unlikeness to himself, truly seeking himself in his associates and moreover in his trade and habits and gestures and meats and drinks, and comes at last to be faithfully represented by every view you take of his circumstances.
Indeed, Carnes' key point is that images are inherently (structurally) iconoclastic since, while an image is connected to its prototype by likeness, it is also distinguished from the prototype by its unlikeness. Negation is thus a necessary part of how the (non-idolatrous) image mediates the imaged.
Hillis Miller observes that Ruskin's thinking tends "toward a theory of allegory in which the visible facts of nature and of human nature stand for what is immeasurably above them in a mode of non-correspondence or unlikeness. All nature and all human nature, named as literal facts, are catachreses for God, the unknown X who can be known and named in no other way.
He calls it, echoing Plotinus, "a place of unlikeness" (regio dissimilitudinis; conf.
Does this mean that, when one thinks in Franciscan, likeness, in a certain sense, is more important than unlikeness? And in that case, wouldn't the gap between Bonaventure and Denys [the Areopogite] signal a particular manner of being in the world, which precisely does not leave the world, and which makes the conversion of the senses the site for a new form of spirituality?
(6) Given that any two items in the world share some but not all of the properties of the respective items, any two items can be deemed alike in some respects and unalike in others, thus making the mere idea of likeness or unlikeness singularly unhelpful.