unlost

unlost

(ʌnˈlɒst)
adj
1. not lost; retained
2. found or regained after having been lost
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Amplifying this point, Steggle cavils with the 'misleading dichotomy' (74) of lost and found: just because a text was printed does not mean that it is entirely 'unlost'.
(18.) Donna Williams, Autism and Sensing: The Unlost Instinct.
"Paradise Unlost." Time and Tide 24 (1 May 1943): 362-63.
In Economy of the Unlost: Reading Simonides of Keos with Paul Celan, Anne Carson writes: "Do poets still watch the flame burn down?
"Fugitive Places: Anne Carson and the Unlost." Anglo-Quebec Poetry, 1976-2006.
The development of self-reliance is to be encouraged strongly and recourse to the rescue service, ideally, should be a last resort." Mr Jones' plea comes in the face of relentless pressure on the volunteer mountain rescue teams as the number of callouts rise, often from hillgoers who cannot or will not get themselves "unlost".
I think everyone should know the things you teach in your class because anyone can get lost but only some can become unlost." I'm glad I learned to use this new technology and can give campers the skills to become "unlost."
The Canadian classics scholar and poet Anne Carson opened her Martin Classical Lectures, Economy of the Unlost (Reading Simonides of Keos with Paul Celan) (1999b), by repudiating scholarly "objectivity" while, at the same time, apparently criticizing the intrusiveness of her own subjectivity: "There is too much self in my writing ...