unlovable

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unlovable

(ʌnˈlʌvəbəl) or

unloveable

adj
not attracting or deserving love
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unlovable - incapable of inspiring love or affectionunlovable - incapable of inspiring love or affection; "she was in some mysterious way...unlovable"-Joseph Conrad
hateful - evoking or deserving hatred; "no vice is universally as hateful as ingratitude"- Joseph Priestly
Translations

unlovable

[ˈʌnˈlʌvəbl] ADJantipático

unlovable

[ˌʌnˈlʌvəbəl] adjantipathique

unlovable

unlovable

[ʌnˈlʌvəbl] adjantipatico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
All are associated with painful states of self-consciousness (Goldberg, 1989; Spero, 1984) linked to a sense of inadequacy, deficiency and unlovability in the eyes of others, causing one to question the basic qualities and existence of the self (Kilborne, 2002; Lansky, 2005a; Lewis, 1971; Wurmser, 1981).
She has the Santa Ana of my sense of basic flaw and unlovability
Certainly, recurring experiences of perceived hopelessness, worthlessness, or unlovability in childhood may contribute to subsequent episodes of depression in later life.
PTSD (Pederson & colleagues); Personality Disorders (Pankey; Manduchi & colleague; Oshiro & colleagues); Unlovability (Tsai & colleague); Body Dysmorphic Disorder (Callaghan and colleagues); Self Problems (Ferro & colleagues); Adolescents (Cattivelli & colleagues); Smoking and Depression (Holman1 & colleagues); Adolescents with Sexual Offense Behaviors (Newring & colleagues); Children (Xavier & colleagues).
He uses the Suicide Cognition Scale, a 20-question instrument that measures core beliefs about perceived burdensomeness, helplessness, unlovability, and poor distress tolerance.
For example, the sharp escalation of client demands on a therapist's time through an endless series of "crisis" calls, walk-ins and prolonged therapy hours may represent a behavioral test of a deeply held prediction: "even my therapist will reject me in the end." This enacted hypothesis may turn out to be part of a larger self-theory that stresses one's essential unlovability. By attempting to grasp the anticipatory meaning of a client's behavior, we as therapists are better able to help clients recognize when their predictions border on self-fulfilling prophecies.
The first dimension--attachment anxiety--refers to anxiety about rejection, abandonment, and unlovability, while the second dimension--attachment avoidance--refers to avoidance of intimacy and dependency.