unmaternal

unmaternal

(ˌʌnməˈtɜːnəl)
adj
not typical of a mother or not characteristically kind and caring like a mother
References in classic literature ?
"I don't know; I 'm tired of evwything, 'cause my toys are all bwoken, and my dolls are all sick but Clawa," moaned Maud, giving a jerk to the Paris doll which she held upside down by one leg in the most unmaternal manner.
The direct expression of anger, especially at men, (supposedly) makes us unladylike, unfeminine, unmaternal and sexually unattractive..."
Terminator 2 remains radical: It has no romance subplot and an unmaternal mother at its heart.
To defend against any anticipated charges of unmaternal monstrosity, the speaker justifies her maternal aversion as a form of marital devotion: "I would be all for him, / Not even children coming 'twixt us two / To call me from his service, to serve them" (ll.
Congratulations from the normally entirely unmaternal Scribbler column too.
For Linda Burnell, the unmaternal mother, it is children, or the bearing of them, that reminds her of her mortality: that secret acknowledgement of the abject is there in her exclusion of Kezia and her sister Lottie from the buggyride: "'We shall simply have to leave them.
And if it's the latter, you will probably never admit it to anyone because it sounds unmaternal, ungrateful and makes you feel like you're not a proper woman.
During the hullabaloo following Thatcher's demise, I noted what Russell Brand said of her: "She is oddly unmaternal. I always felt a bit sorry for her biological children...
(86) Moreover, by giving Medea's and Phaedra's mythic predicaments a Roman cast, Seneca inches their monstrous, supposedly unmaternal acts unnervingly closer to a contemporary familial and institutional norm.
She is still a child when her mother dies suddenly, and she and her brother James are wrenched from their beloved grandparents to live with their spinster aunt, the very unmaternal Agnes.
Addie Bundren's eyes, "like two candles when you watch them gutter down into the sockets of iron candle-sticks" (8), form just one of the strokes of her visage as a "composite picture," a picture that is being composed through Faulkner's portrayal--a portrait of the unmaternal mother who is a reigning figure here and elsewhere in Faulkner's fiction.
(32) In many adultery novels the protagonist is portrayed as unmaternal: she may be bored, or unable to find satisfaction in her role as mother, and thus open to the exotic charms of an affair.