unmathematical

unmathematical

(ˌʌnˌmæθəˈmætɪkəl)
adj
1. not characterized by or using the precision of mathematics; inexact; imprecise
2. (Mathematics) not using, determined by, or in accordance with the principles of mathematics
References in periodicals archive ?
One would think the Comelec would rush to reassure her and other watchdog groups that everything was on the up-and-up and the puzzling seven-hour delay and 'unmathematical' patterns of voting have rational explanations.
The book then guides the reader through ontology and metaontology of situations and presentation, state and representation, cardinal and ordinal numbers, constructibility, forcing and generic sets before concluding with the classically unmathematical concepts of subject, truth, event, and intervention.
Shaw, "Curriculum '78--is computer science really that unmathematical?" Communications of the ACM, vol.
Relative to the refined science and logic--mathematics of Korzybski's time, Korzybski dubbed false-to-facts, pseudoscientific, illogical, and unmathematical kinds of thinking "aristotelian." His choice for that term was slightly unfortunate for it maligned the manifold contributions made by Aristotle to a number of fields, but Korzybski's word choice was meant to single out some primary notions in logic that were attributed to Aristotle and enforced within classical teaching for hundreds of years.
Curiously, the legend to this Figure states that "A larger proportion of circumcised men had higher Low, Moderate, and High ALEX scores than uncircumcised men as shown by these smoothed distribution curves." Such an assertion is unmathematical. By using a "cut and weigh" technique to determine the area under each curve, we calculated that 30 percent (71/236) of the circumcised men had a "High ALEX" score (shown as > 61) compared with 15 percent (23/64) of the uncircumcised men.
There is much to be learned from this book about both the history and the theory of mathematics--Potters is generous with his description and quotation of some remarkably interesting primary texts--and even the most deplorably unmathematical reader will come away not only much better informed but also with a deeper sense of the richness of cultural and intellectual possibility that distinguished the thirteenth century in general and the Frederician court in particular.
To a bookish but unmathematical person such as Donne, the day-by-day planetary and zodiacal positions were available ready-computed in J.