unmistakable

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un·mis·tak·a·ble

 (ŭn′mĭ-stā′kə-bəl)
adj.
Impossible to mistake or misinterpret; obvious: unmistakable signs of illness.

un′mis·tak′a·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

unmistakable

(ˌʌnmɪsˈteɪkəbəl) or

unmistakeable

adj
not mistakable; clear, obvious, or unambiguous
ˌunmisˈtakableness, ˌunmisˈtakeableness n
ˌunmisˈtakably, ˌunmisˈtakeably adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

un•mis•tak•a•ble

(ˌʌn mɪˈsteɪ kə bəl)

adj.
not mistakable; clear; obvious.
[1660–70]
un`mis•tak′a•bly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unmistakable - clearly evident to the mindunmistakable - clearly evident to the mind; "his opposition to slavery was unmistakable"
clear - readily apparent to the mind; "a clear and present danger"; "a clear explanation"; "a clear case of murder"; "a clear indication that she was angry"; "gave us a clear idea of human nature"
2.unmistakable - clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment; "the effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the parched fields"; "evident hostility"; "manifest disapproval"; "patent advantages"; "made his meaning plain"; "it is plain that he is no reactionary"; "in plain view"
obvious - easily perceived by the senses or grasped by the mind; "obvious errors"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

unmistakable

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

unmistakable

adjective
1. Clearly defined; not ambiguous:
2. Easily seen through due to a lack of subtlety:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
واضِح، لا يَدَعُ مجالا للشَّك
nepochybný
ikke til at tage fejl af
augljóslega
su niekuo nesupainiojamas
nekļūdīgsnepārprotams
anlaşılmaması olanaksızçok açık

unmistakable

[ˈʌnmɪsˈteɪkəbl] ADJinconfundible, inequívoco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

unmistakable

unmistakeable [ˌʌnmɪsˈteɪkəbəl] adj [voice, sound, smell] → caractéristique, reconnaissable entre tous(toutes)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

unmistak(e)able

adjunverkennbar; (visually) → nicht zu verwechseln; to send an unmistakable message to somebody (fig)jdm eine unmissverständliche Botschaft senden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

unmistakable

unmistakeable [ˌʌnmɪsˈteɪkəbl] adj (person, sound) → inconfondibile; (displeasure, meaning) → indubbio/a, lampante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

unmistakable

(anmiˈsteikəbl) adjective
very clear; impossible to mistake. His meaning was unmistakable.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The elimination [by Winstar] of the unmistakability doctrine from interpretation of rights under quasi-regulatory agreements amounts to a significant power shift away from the government's sovereign authority and towards the property rights of private contractors....
This is referred to as the "unmistakability doctrine." Some states have amended their constitutions to specifically provide that public pension benefits shall be considered contractual in nature, and no controversy exists in those states regarding whether a contract is created.
words, we can no longer believe in the unmistakability or uniqueness of
(71.) Professor Young trembles at the very thought of disagreeing with Judge Boudin, see Rhode Island Brotherhood, 357 F.3d at 45-46, but it is not at all clear to us that the so-called "unmistakability doctrine" applies in this context.
Both the unmistakability and reserved powers or sovereign acts doctrines are construed in great detail in United States v.
Where in public space does the visibility, the unmistakability of art begin?
Even if the government's sovereign powers are not involved with enforcement of the government's contractual obligations, the contract may be subject to the unmistakability doctrine if the damages that the private party "seek[s] amount to [an] exemption from the new law." Id.
The plurality decision discusses and intermixes the previous separate doctrines of "Unmistakability" and "Sovereign Acts"--and introduces the concept of "risk-sharing" as the primary arbiter of government liability.
The clarity of the directional processes and the unmistakability of their goals should presumably be recognizable regardless of the actual order of presentation.
Under the "unmistakability doctrine," as it has been applied, the enactment of an incentive subsidy may not be considered an action by Congress expressly intended to bind future congresses.(164) What if, however, upon enacting an incentive tax credit, Congress were to insert language of the following sort: Any taxpayer who acts in reliance on this incentive credit and who claims the credit on her federal income tax return will have a contractual right to that credit so long as the credit is in force and has not been repealed as of the time the investment is made; this right will be enforceable against the U.S.
But, as Christopher Ricks notes, such "unmistakability" can be perceived as a limitation (255), and features which enhance Stevie Smith's individuality can be made into a case for her marginal status.