unmusical


Also found in: Thesaurus.

un·mu·si·cal

 (ŭn-myo͞o′zĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Sounding harsh to the ear; dissonant.
2. Not skilled or interested in music.

un·mu′si·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

unmusical

(ʌnˈmjuːzɪkəl)
adj
1. (Music, other) not musical or harmonious
2. (Music, other) not talented in or appreciative of music
unˈmusically adv
unˈmusicalness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

un•mu•si•cal

(ʌnˈmyu zɪ kəl)

adj.
1. deficient in melody, harmony, rhythm, or tone.
2. not fond of or skilled in music.
[1600–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unmusical - lacking interest in or talent for musicunmusical - lacking interest in or talent for music; "too unmusical to care for concerts"; "it is unfortunate that her children were all nonmusical"
musical - talented in or devoted to music; "comes from a very musical family"
2.unmusical - not musical in natureunmusical - not musical in nature; "the unmusical cry of the bluejay"
musical - characteristic of or resembling or accompanied by music; "a musical speaking voice"; "a musical comedy"
3.unmusical - lacking melodyunmusical - lacking melody      
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

unmusical

adjective
Characterized by unpleasant discordance of sound:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

unmusical

[ˈʌnˈmjuːzɪkəl] ADJ [sound, rendition] → inarmónico; [person] → poco musical, sin oído para la música
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

unmusical

adj personunmusikalisch; soundunmelodisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

unmusical

[ʌnˈmjuːzɪkl] adj (sound) → disarmonico/a; (person) → che non ha orecchio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
An unmusical instrument, played by holding it fast with the teeth and trying to brush it away with the finger.
But three short unmusical Saxon words, yet it was as though a mystical strain of music had passed through the wood.
But can the musician by his art make men unmusical?
Sorrow and misfortune overtake the legislature that still from year to year permits Tahoe to retain its unmusical cognomen!
Sikes proceeded to drink brandy at a furious rate, and to flourish the crowbar in an alarming manner; yelling forth, at the same time, most unmusical snatches of song, mingled with wild execrations.
He roared out the catch in a harsh, unmusical voice, and ended with a shout of laughter.
we do like cowbirds and cuckoos, which lay their eggs in nests which other birds have built, and cheer no traveller with their chattering and unmusical notes.
The angels are so enamored of the language that is spoken in heaven that they will not distort their lips with the hissing and unmusical dialects of men, but speak their own, whether there be any who understand it or not.
For an up-to-date definition of tanager, we turned to the online Unabridged Merriam-Webster which defines it thus: "any of numerous American passerine birds (family Thraupidae) having brightly colored males, being mainly unmusical, and chiefly inhabiting woodlands."
Unfortunately, poet Terry Blackhawk recites her wonderful text in a stiff, wooden fashion that feels very unmusical and emotionally unpersuasive.
Martin Swales's chapter, "Reflectivity, Music and the Modern Condition: Thoughts on Goethe's Faust," continues Bodley's line of inquiry, about the piece as a fundamentally musical work in the vein of musical theater, by exploring the role of an unmusical protagonist, Faust.
The military had its own name for the Victory Vertical, a starkly unmusical name that was perfect for, say, a shipping manifest or a crate stencil: the Olive Drab Government Issue Field Piano, abbreviated ODGI.