unnewsworthy

unnewsworthy

(ʌnˈnjuːzˌwɜːðɪ)
adj
1. (Journalism & Publishing) (of a story or incident) not important or significant enough to be considered news
2. (Broadcasting) (of a story or incident) not important or significant enough to be considered news
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
to pry into unnewsworthy private affairs of their fellowmen?
(51) In so holding, the Court noted that the advertisement discussed issues of "clear 'public interest,'" such as the legal status of abortion in New York, which was "not unnewsworthy." (52) By contrast, the Virginia Supreme Court had upheld the newspaper's conviction for violating Virginia's law against advertising abortion services, on the ground that the law pertained to medical care and was clearly within the state's police power to pass.
Faced with such unnewsworthy copy, reporters turned to the "barstool biologists" of the surrounding towns and learned all they needed to know about the disaster that was the National Park Service's natural fires policy (vilified by the press as the "Let It Burn Policy").
But attacked or not, repressed or not, suddenly unnewsworthy or not, Jimmy did what Jimmy was.
After all, what could be more unnewsworthy than "war is bad" or "some people are very cruel to other people" or "I am against war"?
Wade (49)--and the ad's "not unnewsworthy" quality, namely the offering of services not available at that time in Virginia.
It is as predictable and unnewsworthy as this summer's record A-level results will be.
This approach would mean that a taxpayer could make such withdrawals whether the damage occurred due to a huge natural disaster, a terrorist attack, or a very localized and relatively unnewsworthy storm, as long as the amount of economic damage exceeded the stated threshold.
This silly ritual, typically in the Rose Garden, is utterly unnewsworthy. It is a waste of taxpayer money and television time, and it is the White House at its most superficial stagecraft using the co-opted media.
Yet they are treated as secrets by academics and educational officials or as unnewsworthy by journalists.
"Journalists, as well as others, should be free to express ideas about celebrities without fear that they could be sued merely because the celebrity did not like that particular expression and deemed it 'unnewsworthy,'" the Reporters Committee/SPJ court brief states.
And more controversially, the so-called "disclosure of private facts" tort bars anyone--including newspapers--from publicizing highly embarrassing and supposedly unnewsworthy information about anyone else.