unoriginate

unoriginate

(ˌʌnəˈrɪdʒɪˌneɪt) or

unoriginated

adj
not having an origin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Even if many of the accounts of creation in Scripture remain unclear as to whether God creates ex nihilo in any strict sense, once the question of unoriginate matter became live, it was incumbent upon theologians to clarify the point.
So species, as stolid objects of scientific predication, became immutable and unoriginate. This they had not been for Plato, who adjusted the likeliness of his likely story to the flickering light of nature's cave but allowed for a becoming not just of individuals but of their natural kinds.
(3) The Father is considered the unoriginate origin throughout the entire orthodox tradition, be it the Photian position where the Father is considered the sole source and arche of the Son and the Spirit, or the Latin filioque, where the Spirit proceeds from both the Father and the Son as a single principle, or the per filium, where the Spirit proceeds from the Father through the Son--a position affirmed by St John of Damascus, St Thomas Aquinas and Jonathan Edwards (to name three notable representatives from the Eastern, Latin, and Reformed traditions).
Father is eternal and unoriginate while Christ is a creature--superior
The ecstasy of God's flowing forth (Spirit) from God as unoriginate source (Father) in relation to Godself (Son) and to the world of creatures (divine economy) presupposes in the inner life of God the expression of love bestowed and exchanged.
From the unoriginate Father came Christ the Lord, not having an external origin (for he himself is the Way and the Root and the Beginning of all things), nor again being born in the way that mortals are, but as Light coming forth from Light.
Here 'father' is opposed not to 'lord' (as in Origen), but to Arius' 'unoriginate', a term Athanasius characterized as 'sub-Christian'.
The Father is the source or fountain fullness of infinite goodness because the Father is primal, unoriginate, and hence self-diffusive.
The divine persons are distinct precisely by relation of origin, and the Father is the Unoriginate from whom Son and (leaving the filioque aside for now) Spirit proceed.
The unoriginate (non ab alio) and ecstatic nature of the Father is the eternal generation of the Son.
Some followers construed Jesus as God's son (though the Creator does not have procreative equipment) or as God's word (though the unoriginate One does not have vocal cords) or as God's wisdom (though God's wisdom is God's presence).
In Johnson's formulation, the image of God as She Who Is signifies in female terms the God who is "pure aliveness in relation, the unoriginate welling up of fullness of life in which the whole universe participates." (24)