unornamental

unornamental

(ˌʌnˌɔːnəˈmɛntəl)
adj
not decorative
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
If you could endure to have such a worthless fellow, and a fellow of such indifferent reputation, coming and going at odd times, I should ask that I might be permitted to come and go as a privileged person here; that I might be regarded as an useless (and I would add, if it were not for the resemblance I detected between you and me, an unornamental) piece of furniture, tolerated for its old service, and taken no notice of.
Wherever one saw a pile of gravel or a pile of broken stone, it was always heaped as trimly and exactly as a new grave or a stack of cannon-balls; nothing about those stations or along the railroad or the wagon-road was allowed to look shabby or be unornamental. The keeping a country in such beautiful order as Germany exhibits, has a wise practical side to it, too, for it keeps thousands of people in work and bread who would otherwise be idle and mischievous.
and these were for the most part skinny, with close-fitting, unornamental bodices and whisking dark skirts, wearing formidably starched white caps over their hair.
Snodgrass wrote on his concert program lines that became the beginning of "Heart's Needle": "Child of my winter, born I When the new soldiers died / On the ice hills, when I was torn." According to Axelrod, these lines contain the essentials of confessional poetry: "an undisguised exposure of painful personal events (in this case Snodgrass's divorce and separation from a child), a dialectic of private matter with public matter (the Korean War), and an intimate, unornamental style" (98).