unpaper

unpaper

(ʌnˈpeɪpə)
vb (tr)
to remove paper from
References in classic literature ?
The little old box-house was still unpainted without and unpapered within.
"There was a little passage in front of me, unpapered and uncarpeted, which turned at a right angle at the farther end.
Her most unique and innovative product from this line is her 'unpaper' towel, which is an eco-friendly alternative to regular paper towels.
Its administrative office, the World Service Authority a nonprofit based in Washington and few blocks from the White House, began issuing passports to refugees, deportees and others among the teeming unwanted and unpapered. By last count, nearly 1 million people are registered and more than 500,000 carry WSA passports granted for modest fees well below what governments demand.
The gun is "unpapered." In Arizona, and most of the rest of the country, it is a perfectly legal transaction.
That law is a patently egregious and shameful one, enacted in a reactionary, isolationist spirit and directed against those people least equipped to defend themselves: refugees, unpapered foreigners, people with neither title nor standing.
they were as unpapered as junkyard dogs, but like the prince of Mark Twain's Prince and the Pauper, they carried royal blood.
However, if your radiator is a column one or a heated towel rail or similar, ie it's not solid, you will need to remove it or you'll see the unpapered wall behind.
Throughout his novels, Owens depicts characters in geographical and metaphysical exile, victims of their "hybrid, unpapered" in-between status, "the product of liminal space, the result of union between desperate individuals on the edges of dispossessed cultures and the marginalized spawn of invaders" (Mixedblood 176).