unpastoral

unpastoral

(ʌnˈpɑːstərəl)
adj
1. (Agriculture) not used or suitable for pasture
2. (Art Terms) not characteristic of or depicting rural life
3. (Sociology) not characteristic of or depicting rural life
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) ecclesiast not characteristic of or befitting a clergyman
References in periodicals archive ?
Domett, who encountered decidedly unpastoral social and political realities in New Zealand, wrote an idealized cross-cultural romance, the ending of which enables "his lovers to reunite and sail off into infinity and the sunset like Waring in Browning's poem" (p.
The most unpastoral is, instead of feeding, to want to be fed,-to be a Mouth" (29-30).
experiences of environmental collapse: "It's as though Le Guin combined the Oklahoma dust bowl of the 1930s with the ecology of the high desert of the southwest." In this "unpastoral environment," the small Anarresti population savors the freedom it finds in local, sustainable, and natural economy: it is "a frontier society which values minimal government, individual freedom, and locally exercised power, production, and consumption." (49)
(48) Coleridge's poems make no reference to these unpastoral intrusions, nor do they refer to the more ancient gothic traditions (as narrated by Newbolt) of the castle's haunted medieval dungeons and the legend of the Till, celebrated in an old ballad for its sudden murderous torrents.
Many priests and bishops have made the decision never to address moral issues from the pulpit, since doing so would cause some people to feel uncomfortable, and making people feel uncomfortable is considered by many to be "unpastoral." The need for confession is rarely preached, if preached at all, and in some parishes throughout the country one has to make an appointment for confession, since there are no established times for it throughout the week.
'The Bishop's statement betrays contempt, once more, for lesbian and gay relationships and should be rejected as unloving, unpastoral and unworkable
Then they walk down to a decidedly unpastoral meadow, "the place where the old car rests, a junker someone finagled / for $85 and a lid of hash" (46).
The risk of being called unpastoral"; (4) the proclamation of "what Christ teaches, through his church and particularly its magisterium in a faithful, integral manner"; (5) "a realistic awareness of the limits of our competence as bishops"; (6) a commitment to catechesis, a "display of ingenuity and initiative in responding to specific local conditions and needs"; and lastly, (7) "it is essential that in our own lives we give witness to our beliefs and values--our personal acceptance of Jesus Christ as Lord and Redeemer.
Paul's called the changes "unpastoral." Banning well-established customs, he said, "could well break the threads that hold the community together." No matter, uniformity was required.
It is on an aspect of this 'unpastoral' revision of the city that I wish to dwell in this article.