unpayable

unpayable

(ʌnˈpeɪəbəl)
adj
incapable of being paid
References in classic literature ?
A fever, a mutilation, a cruel disappointment, a loss of wealth, a loss of friends, seems at the moment unpaid loss, and unpayable. But the sure years reveal the deep remedial force that underlies all facts.
The first victims of whatever military actions are undertaken will be the billions of people living in the poor and underdeveloped world, with their unbelievable economic and social problems: their unpayable debts, and the ruinous prices of their basic commodities; their growing natural and ecological catastrophes, their hunger and misery, the massive undernourishment of their children, teenagers and adults; their terrible AIDS epidemic, their malaria, their tuberculosis, and their infectious diseases that threaten whole nations with extermination.
Debt is a big part of the problem: sub-Saharan Africa owes $210bn - about $64bn in arrears that make the debt basically unpayable.
`The poor asked for bread and were given a stone.' He pledged that Jubilee 2000's campaign for `total cancellation of unpayable debt' would continue.
Although none of this will matter over the next year, the cost will ultimately be an unpayable fiscal burden further down the line.
The campaign calls for a one-time cancellation of the unpayable debt owed by the world's poorest countries.
If most of the debt is unpayable, why do their creditors continue to squeeze these destitute nations?
The network, the viewers and the game itself, are in eternal, unpayable debt to Michael Jordan.
Some consumer groups believe the companies should write off the unpayable debt, but many observers say that approach would bankrupt most utilities.
A global movement called Jubilee 2000, which calls for the cancellation of poor countries' unpayable debts by the beginning of the new millennium, has gained surprising momentum.
Many unpayable debts were incurred by corrupt regimes that have now been replaced by democratic governments.
As a result, Burney conceives her situation as author to be one of "placelessness and universal obligation," of "ceaseless circulation and unpayable debt" (205).