unperformable

unperformable

(ˌʌnpəˈfɔːməbəl)
adj
not capable of being performed or done
References in periodicals archive ?
However, given that two or more actions can extensionally overlap without thereby being mutually unperformable, if such actions are specified in the relevant rights, then those rights will not be incompossible, notwithstanding their extensional overlap.
The 1872 Mlada is, as a whole, completely unperformable. Large chunks of its music and libretto were lost or never written, and while a few of the extant sections were published as isolated numbers, most were later incorporated into works such as Mussorgsky's Sorochintsy Fair, Borodin's Prince Igor, or Rimsky-Korsakov's later solo opera-ballet on the Mlada subject matter.
The opera was long considered unperformable, but the Cambridge professor remained adamant: "The music must be saved."
Anguish is responding to Ecclestone's stage directions which are written in the usual style of Restoration drama's descriptions of stage sets, just as Dryden, even though The State of Innocence was unperformed and unperformable, continued to write set descriptions in the style of the spectacle of Restoration opera.
From Grainger, an accurate score that was not only virtually unreadable, but unperformable.
Analytical language, which is unperformable, cannot hope to comprehend literature, which can only be a performance (341); this incommensurability is a "subtly vitiating impediment" to aesthetics that cannot be worked around and is only ever concealed by an "equivocation" in critical language (339).
"All you heard was that these plays were unperformable, that they didn't work," says Kaplan, who believes the main reason for the dismissive attitude was "homophobia, plain and simple." If the times in general have made audiences more receptive to these dramas, the fests "showed that these plays work as plays."
The consensus of opinion is that Mariam was written to be read aloud by Cary's domestic circle (rather than staged as part of an aristocratic entertainment); some critics see the play as not only unperformed but also unperformable. (2)
For instance, Zinaida Gippius, among other early critics, maintained that the play was "unperformable," thus launching an "anti-Chekhovian school of criticism" (Rayfield 241).
Readers familiar with Dillon's first monograph, Medieval Music-Making and the 'Roman de Fauvel' (Cambridge University Press, 2002), will recall the imaginative flair and analytical insight she brought to this much-studied manuscript showing how music can be expressive in ways that are unperformable apart from visual representation.
Pepper--with its array of jump cuts, sound effects and multi-track overlays that could only be accomplished in a studio--has gone down in rock history as the first album to blast away the boundaries of traditional stage pop in ways that made it absolutely unperformable in a live act.