unpitied

unpitied

(ʌnˈpɪtɪd)
adj
not pitied; pitiless
References in classic literature ?
You who see your betters bearing up under this shame every day, meekly suffering under the slights of fortune, gentle and unpitied, poor, and rather despised for their poverty, do you ever step down from your prosperity and wash the feet of these poor wearied beggars?
How many thousands of people are there, women for the most part, who are doomed to endure this long slavery?--who are hospital nurses without wages--sisters of Charity, if you like, without the romance and the sentiment of sacrifice--who strive, fast, watch, and suffer, unpitied, and fade away ignobly and unknown.
Thou com'st, indeed, As a poor miserable captive thrall Comes to the place where he before had sat Among the prime in splendour, now deposed, Ejected, emptied, gazed, unpitied, shunned, A spectacle of ruin, or of scorn, To all the host of Heaven.
He felt himself perishing slowly in unpitied misery.
what if all Her stores were op'n'd, and this Firmament Of Hell should spout her Cataracts of Fire, Impendent horrors, threatning hideous fall One day upon our heads; while we perhaps Designing or exhorting glorious Warr, Caught in a fierie Tempest shall be hurl'd Each on his rock transfixt, the sport and prey Of racking whirlwinds, or for ever sunk Under yon boyling Ocean, wrapt in Chains; There to converse with everlasting groans, Unrespited, unpitied, unrepreevd, Ages of hopeless end; this would be worse.
"Yes, Razumov," she continued, in an impressive, lowered voice, "it was like a lurid light in which I stood, still almost a child, and cursed not the toil, not the misery which had been his lot, but the great social iniquity of the system resting on unrequited toil and unpitied sufferings.
This quotation is a vast improvement over this vaguely similar statement by Irish-born British statesman Edmund Burke: "When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Carlyle's dislike of gigs is expressed in satiric mode in The Diamond Necklace (1833), in which he uses what he revealingly calls Jeanne de Saint-Remi's "Gigmanity" to characterize her as "one of the saddest, pitiable, unpitied predicaments of a man" (63).
speechless orphan boy "thrown out helpless and unpitied on the
When I do fear again, let me be struck With forked fire, and unpitied die.
Democratic accountability and balances of power are also critical, for "when bad men combine, the good must associate, else they will fail, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle" (Knights of Labor of North America 1883, title page).
The first is a verse from the biblical prophet Hosea (1:6): "Call her Lo'ruchama," meaning "Unloved" or "Unpitied." Considering both the book's title and the unfolding of its story, it is worth recalling that the Hebrew ruchama belongs to the same semantic field as r'chm or "womb." The second citation is from Calvin's Epistle to the Faithful Demonstrating How Christ Is the End of the Law, in which the theologian argues that the entirety of man will have been a complete disgrace to God unless he has repented.