unpoetic

(redirected from unpoetical)

unpoetic

(ˌʌnpəʊˈɛtɪk) or

unpoetical

adj
(Poetry) not elevated, sublime, etc, as is characteristic of poetry
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

unpoetic

[ˈʌnpəʊˈetɪk] ADJpoco poético
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

unpoetic

, unpoetical
adj, unpoetically
advunpoetisch, undichterisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
For purposes of euphony, however, without which the lines would be harsh and unpoetical, I have invariably made two syllables of them.
As Queequeg and I are now fairly embarked in this business of whaling; and as this business of whaling has somehow come to be regarded among landsmen as a rather unpoetical and disreputable pursuit; therefore, I am all anxiety to convince ye, ye landsmen, of the injustice hereby done to us hunters of whales.
"Suppose we take our breakfast?" was Joe's unpoetical change of tune, at last, for the keen, open air had mightily sharpened his appetite.
Well, the Government has seized all this in effect, and will yet seize it in rigid and unpoetical reality, no doubt.
He draws the material of his figures of speech from highly unpoetical sources--partly from the activities of every-day life, but especially from all the sciences and school-knowledge of the time.
And we must beg Homer and the other poets not to be angry if we strike out these and similar passages, not because they are unpoetical, or unattractive to the popular ear, but because the greater the poetical charm of them, the less are they meet for the ears of boys and men who are meant to be free, and who should fear slavery more than death.
A great poet, a really great poet, is the most unpoetical of all creatures.
The rain he finally attributed to the stars, the moon, and the sun; but his hypothesis was entirely unlovely and unpoetical.
While Webster seems to want to avoid privileging one type of imagination over the other, she continually positions the unpoetical imagination and the counterfactual thinking it produces in terms of lack--not only as lacking aesthetic appreciation but as lacking the ability to go beyond the limits of the self as well.
The extremes and excrescences he foresaw would "gradually disappear; but at last this great advantage will remain--besides a freer form, richer and more diversified subjects will have been attained, and no object of the broadest world and the most manifold life will be any longer excluded as unpoetical" (Goethe 252).
A Poet is the most unpoetical of any thing in existence; because he has no Identity--he is continually in for--and filling some other Body--The Sun, the Moon, the Sea and Men and Women who are creatures of impulse are poetical and have about them an unchangeable attribute--the poet has none; no identity--he is certainly the most unpoetical of all God's Creatures.
"[S]ince the end of poetry is pleasure," he writes of Milton's autobiographical passages in Paradise Lost, "that cannot be unpoetical with which all are pleased." We have much to learn from such a critic, and nowhere more than in his encounter with Milton.