unprofaned

unprofaned

(ˌʌnprəˈfeɪnd)
adj
not profaned or violated
Translations
improfané
References in classic literature ?
I discovered that my house actually had its site in such a withdrawn, but forever new and unprofaned, part of the universe.
Wordsworth then turns in Book 2 to the mimesis of sound: "whate'er there is of power in sound / To breathe an elevated mood, by form / Or image unprofaned" (lines 324-26, quoted 123).
This concern informs his rendering of burial sites in Cleopatra that are "yet unprofaned" by avaricious "tourists" (Cleopatra 2).
I'll tweak the account (a recurring Wordsworth-paradox) to say that savings also accrue credit: it takes a human imagination, as Wordsworth writes in first drafts, to feel a "power in sound / To breathe an elevated mood, by form / Or image unprofaned" (Wordsworth, The Prelude, 1798-1799, ed.
Their's was the task (and nobly they performed it) to possess themselves, and through themselves, us, of this goodly land; and to uprear upon its hills and its valleys, a political edifice of liberty and equal rights; 'tis ours only, to transmit these, the former, unprofaned by the foot of an invader; the latter, undecayed by the lapse of time, and untorn by usurpation--to the latest generation that fate shall permit the world to know.
(3) Where for the radical Historical Essay on the English Constitution (1771) the system of representative government established by Alfred had been overturned by the Norman Conquest, then had records of its existence destroyed by 'arbitrary kings, and men of arbitrary principles', Beattie's Sage here foresees instead the future 'influence unprofaned' of this government, invoking a history of apparently uninterrupted progress which begins to compete with the cyclical narrative that had hitherto been dominant in the poem: 'Hail sacred Polity, by Freedom rear'd!/ Hail sacred Freedom, when by Law restrain'd!' (55).
I discovered that my house actually had its site in such a withdrawn, but forever new and unprofaned, part of the universe.
They judge of what has been and cannot conceive of anything that is to be." And his vehement rejection of this alien, class-based masculine culture leads him to describe the ring as "a spot of virgin-green closed in and unprofaned by vulgar tread" (17:80).
an accumulation of spiritual presences or unprofaned mysteries, that