unpunishable


Also found in: Legal.

unpunishable

(ʌnˈpʌnɪʃəbəl)
adj
not able to be punished
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
almost impersonal and certainly quite unpunishable.
The ARLEM report, which was adopted in Giza, Egypt, at the assembly's annual plenary meeting, concludes that violence against women is both "endemic" and under-reported, with female genital mutilation common Egypt and Mauritania, rates of child marriage increasing in some countries, and rape by husbands remaining unpunishable in many countries.
I said that the Court preferred privacy to freedom of speech, but in this case, the direct statutory provision (202) that makes a speaker unpunishable was critical.
Would the student's comments be unpunishable, or would they not count as speech at all?
knows how many unpunishable things like the times as a boy he'd
Many of the worst attacks against a bank's security remain unpunishable by law in Nigeria.
At the root of Europe's fiscal woes are not everyday policy miscalculations, but deep structural problems that are hard to fix: a social contract beset by high welfare expenditures, including large agricultural subsidies, troubled social security systems across the continent due to an aging citizenry and high unemployment rates, and nonoverlapping monetary and fiscal jurisdictions rendering threats to common currency by rogue members nearly unpunishable.
Above, the children loudly barked with laughter as they flew across the southern sky in new sneakers, caroming off some zodiacal animals, describing orbits around one another, sounding unpunishable to those below.
There is somewhat of a circular process involved here, since the lack of enjoyment of universal favor allows for/permits the articulation of damning attributions, while such attributions become the basis for withholding universal favor: there is just something that is not quite right about the social subject, which allows for games like "smear the queer" to kick in and to be permissible and unpunishable.
1939) ("[I]t is plainly evident that if capital punishment were abolished and the bloodcurdling assaults [earlier described by the author as "fiendish crimes of low-grade types of Negroes"] were unpunishable by death, mob violence would be supreme.
Allowing aggression to remain unpunishable would be a triumph of Power over Reason.