unravished

unravished

(ʌnˈrævɪʃt)
adj
1. not ravished, sexually assaulted, or violated; pure
2. not ravished, seized, or carried off
References in periodicals archive ?
Given that "Every nation has idiosyncrasies which differentiate it from others and make it feel isolated from, attracted to or repelled by them" (Goethe, Collected Works 225), Goethe calls upon his contemporaries to respect and leave untouched or unravished the special or peculiar characteristics of other nations or languages, in order to meet or understand them on their own grounds.
As can be seen here the woman is the "unravished bride of quietness" as she, as a category, stands for the absence that helps to define what man is or does.
The "Gala Xmas Number" (December 1962), dedicated to the "mass murderers" Kennedy and Khrushchev, announces the "First Annual Worlds [sic] Worst Poetry Contest"--pretty funny, in that Yeah published quite a few contenders, not least Kupferberg's travesty of Keats's 1820 "Ode on a Grecian Urn," "Ode on the Chinese Bomb": "Thou still unravished bomb of quietness!" In truth, Kupferberg would prove a better songwriter than poet ("Morning, Morning," from 1966, may be the only Fugs composition to merit the adjective lovely, and "Nothing," from the previous year, adapted from a monstrously ironic, dirgelike Yiddish paean to potatoes, is a masterpiece of Zen Judaism), but he was a marvelously dexterous mimeographer.
The speaker rains questions down on the Urn, and when she, the "still unravished bride of quietness," refuses satisfaction, he flings at her his complaint of "Cold Pastoral!" (11.
'Pushkin's Still Unravished Bride: A Psychoanalytic Study of Tat'jana's Dream', Russian Literature 25(2): 215-58.
Addiction to perfection: The still unravished bride.
Since the subject is in some degree sexual, it is worth recalling that the urn itself is a "still unravished bride" (1).
I was reminded of two lines in John Keats "Ode to a Grecian urn", "Thou still unravished bride of quietness ...
The "sublimation" involved is then the virginity of the beloved, displacing the feeling of belatedness, the feeling this "minorpiece of the 1740's" reflects in evoking cultural symbols that are far from being still unravished brides of quietness.
Keats' presentation of the urn as an 'unravished bride of quietness ' and a 'foster child of silence and slow time ' justifies his increasing awareness of the transitoriness of worldly things and his longing for sweeter 'unheard music'(music of the soul from within?) because heard music is ephemeral and is played to the pleasure of the 'sensual ear' only.
Janine Barchas's 2012 Matters of Fact in Jane Austen extends Greene's article in extraordinary detail, examining Austens daring use of famous names from the peerage" (4) in powerful depth as part of Austen's deep interest in, and concern with, English history and politics--further rebutting the stereotype of Austen as another unravished bride of quietness, the British Emily Dickinson (also type-cast in ways that understate her professionalism).