unreadable

(redirected from unreadability)
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unreadable

not interesting; not worth reading: The book was unreadable.
Not to be confused with:
illegible – impossible or hard to read: The handwriting was illegible.

un·read·a·ble

 (ŭn-rē′də-bəl)
adj.
1. Not legible or decipherable; illegible: unreadable handwriting.
2. Unsuitable for or not worth reading: unreadable prose.
3. Not interesting; dull: wholly unreadable statistics.
4. Incomprehensible; opaque: an unreadable facial expression.

un·read′a·bil′i·ty n.

unreadable

(ʌnˈriːdəbəl)
adj
1. illegible; undecipherable
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) difficult or tedious to read
unˌreadaˈbility, unˈreadableness n
unˈreadably adv
illegible, unreadable - Illegible refers to bad handwriting, while unreadable refers to poor writing.
See also related terms for poor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unreadable - not easily decipheredunreadable - not easily deciphered; "indecipherable handwriting"
illegible - (of handwriting, print, etc.) not legible; "illegible handwriting"

unreadable

adjective
1. turgid, heavy going, badly written, dry as dust Most computer ads used to be unreadable.
2. illegible, undecipherable, crabbed She scribbled an unreadable address on the receipt.
Translations

unreadable

[ˈʌnˈriːdəbl] ADJ
1. (= turgid) [book] → imposible de leer
I found the book unreadableel libro me resultó pesadísimo
2. (= illegible) [handwriting etc] → ilegible
3. (Comput) [data] → ilegible
4. (liter) (= impenetrable) [face, eyes] → impenetrable

unreadable

adj
writingunleserlich; bookschwer zu lesen pred, → schwer lesbar
(Comput) datanicht lesbar
(liter: = impenetrable) face, eyesundurchdringlich

unreadable

[ʌnˈriːdəbl] adjilleggibile
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, he said, PhilHealth had sent back collection forms to CGHMC 'based on unsubstantiated reasons,' such as the unreadability of statement of accounts.
The romantic fantasy shows its obscene underside: sex, pain, violence, and above all the chilling unreadability of the object of desire.
Her most recent book is Textual Silence: Unreadability and the Holocaust (2017).
The poems suggest an underlying unreadability, a lack of direct referentiality, and a failed transmission of meaning, which in Dharker's poetry becomes a question interpellating the reader.
As long as the FASB and the IASB avoid addressing real issues--improved accounting for intangibles, the constant increase in subjective managerial estimates and forecasts underlying financial information (mainly from fair value accounting), and the total obscurity and unreadability of financial reports--there will be no progress in financial reporting usefulness.
Kincaid's response to this unreadability of the Wisteria is the repeated refrain "what to do?" When Kincaid asks "What should I do?
[...] But in the allegory of unreadability, the imperatives of truth and falsehood oppose the narrative syntax and manifest themselves at its expense.
The unreadability of the Character Heads has been an issue from the first moment they passed into the public domain.
Describing the absence of a vigorous engagement with Islamism in postcolonial theory as part of the 'politics of invisibility and unreadability' in postcolonial theory, Young advocates a (re)reading of Islamism as an 'oppositional discourse and practice' to western imperialism.
Nutritionless language, meaningless language, unloved language, entartete sprache, everyday speech, illegibility, unreadability, machinistic repetition.
Note that the performance at [[sigma].sub.ob] - 0.05 is quite similar to that at [[sigma].sub.ob] - 0.06; thus we do not draw the performance at [[sigma].sub.ob] - 0.06 in Figures 2, 3, 4, and 5 to avoid unreadability.
Ross argues that the poem's ironic stroke both deflates the idealistic pretensions of its narrator--who shares the fetishizing aesthetics of the young Baudelaire--and affirms the noisy unreadability of our encounters with others, "the reader experiencing the tormenting unavailability to scrutiny" of the glazier and estrangement from the narrator (141).