unrecapturable

unrecapturable

(ˌʌnriːˈkæptʃərəbəl)
adj
not able to be recaptured or brought back
References in periodicals archive ?
When in the fourth episode the old Daphne lies in her bed thinking of the past, she mulls over the fate of so many books she has read: they appear to give back only dim recollections, like "a coloured shadow at the edge of sight, as vague and unrecapturable as something seen in the rain from a passing vehicle: looked at directly it vanished altogether" (498).
(143) Thus, if one bank "lends" money to another bank by purchasing a loan bill, the lending bank need not fear that the outlay of capital will then be unrecapturable in the short term to meet liquidity needs because Nationalbanken would supply it, if necessary.
(357) It is a recessional, mourning "the scandal / of ways lost, of names gone under" (358), the slipping backwards into oblivion of cultures and generations, each life utterly unique and unrecapturable. All the many types of life named in the poem have gradually disappeared: the mammoths of the evolutionary past, the inconceivably complex plant and animal networks ceding to monoculture, the native Indians' cultures, her own elder relatives.
The lawyer "is likely to find herself in an alien and unrecapturable social and conceptual world."(163) The more the past is revealed, the more its usefulness in addressing the problems of the present recedes.