unredressed

unredressed

(ˌʌnrɪˈdrɛst)
adj
1. not made right or compensated for
2. (of persons) not released from injustice
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser.
But it is at least problematical, whether an unjust sentence against a foreigner, where the subject of controversy was wholly relative to the lex loci, would not, if unredressed, be an aggression upon his sovereign, as well as one which violated the stipulations of a treaty or the general law of nations.
There being no such intermediate body between the State legislatures and the people interested in watching the conduct of the former, violations of the State constitutions are more likely to remain unnoticed and unredressed.
Every nation that carries in its bosom great and unredressed injustice has in it the elements of this last convulsion.
Some day, perchance, in joust or in tourney, knight may wish to wear my colors, and then I shall tell him that if he does indeed crave my favor there is wrong unredressed, and the wronger the Socman of Minstead.
at 388 ("The question is not what remedy the court should provide for a wrong that would otherwise go unredressed. It is whether an elaborate remedial system that has been constructed step by step, with careful attention to conflicting policy considerations, should be augmented by the creation of a new judicial remedy for the constitutional violation at issue.").
As the Grant majority itself notes, "for every Charter breach that comes before the courts, many others may go unidentified and unredressed because they did not turn up relevant evidence leading to a criminal charge".
Sereno by eight members of the Supreme Court (SC), six of whom should have inhibited themselves from the quo warranto proceedings but chose to act as witness, prosecutor, judge and virtual executioner all rolled into one out of seemingly personal spite, is an act of treachery that should not go unredressed.
(131) James Pfander looks to eighteenth-century Scots law which permitted an exception to the ordinary standing rules to bring forward a "popular action" (action popularis) which enabled a person or members of the public to purse a claim on behalf of the general public where a public wrong might otherwise go unredressed, or to vindicate a public right.
The actio popularis authorized any person to pursue a claim on behalf of the public in cases in which a public delict or wrong might otherwise go unredressed. (29) The Scots version of the actio popularis empowered an individual (a pursuer) to mount a claim for relief, often an action for a declaratory judgment, when the defendant (a defender, which was often a public body) had impinged on rights held in common by a variety of individuals.
And, all reflect a considered judgment that those values are sufficiently precious that their protection justifies leaving even serious wrongs "unredressed." (259) Granted, for complicated reasons, no existing safeguard necessarily rules out the prospect of retaliatory RICO liability.
To point out that many of these evils are demonstrably more pronounced, savage, and unredressed in non-Western cultures is to violate the first commandment of multiculturalism: Thou Shalt Only Disparage Thine Own Culture.