unrelievable

unrelievable

(ˌʌnrɪˈliːvəbəl)
adj
not able to be relieved or assuaged
References in periodicals archive ?
or spinal stenosis who are in unrelievable distress, but not expected to
Our current position would be cold comfort for those in unrelievable pain who have decided that they want to take active steps to hasten their deaths.
"This means that if you're going to sedate someone to unconsciousness, the level of suffering needs to be pretty profound and unrelievable," Dr.
The trouble, though, is that the protocol has been taken to apply not only to pain, but also to other kinds of serious and unrelievable conditions --total lifelong dependency, for example, or lack of any capacity for communication, or progressive paralysis resulting in total immobility.
In addition, most children with an esophageal perforation lack many of the risk factors for complications that are often seen in adults: unrelievable distal obstruction, malignancy, repeated dilation procedures, and chronic systemic corticosteroid treatment.
Another problem is that unrelievable suffering is often not associated with terminal illness - the people whom I have seen who have been suffering the most, have either been extensively damaged by illness or accident or affected by bereavement.
if you're suffering from a condition that causes unrelievable pain symptoms, discuss depression with your health care professional; pain can be a trigger for depression.
Indeed, that is never necessary as total sedation, in the rare cases where pain is otherwise unrelievable, should always be available to all who need it, as, of course, should fully adequate pain relief treatment.
Foremost among these, he argues, is an apparently unrelievable tension between metaphysical realism and antirealism, a seemingly irresistible slide toward relativism with respect to issues of meaning and truth, and not least, the problem of reconciling reasons with causes (or spontaneity with receptivity, as McDowell puts it following Kant) within a broadly naturalistic conception of the world.
It wasn't the law but his daughter's unrelievable suffering that was foremost in his mind.
Once society authorizes physician-assisted suicide for competent, terminally ill patients experiencing unrelievable suffering, it will be difficult, if not impossible, to contain the option to such a limited group.
(We must be sure to address the concept of unrelievable pain in any future challenges.) Justice Stephen Breyer, in particular, revealed a shocking naivete, writing that it is unnecessary to protect dying patients from state laws banning assisted suicide because "there is no dispute that dying patients in Washington and New York can obtain palliative care, even when doing so would hasten their deaths." Thus he concludes, "The laws before us do not force a dying person to undergo that kind of pain." After several readings, I'm convinced that Breyer's insulated viewpoint also encompasses a sincere belief that assisted suicide is currently available and being routinely performed.