unremembered


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unremembered

(ˌʌnrɪˈmɛmbəd)
adj
1. not remembered; forgotten
2. obsolete (of a person) forgetful
References in classic literature ?
THE morning sunlight shining in at a badly curtained window; a clumsy wooden bed, with big twisted posts that reached to the ceiling; on one side of the bed, my mother's welcome face; on the other side, an elderly gentleman unremembered by me at that moment--such were the objects that presented themselves to my view, when I first consciously returned to the world that we live in.
Not entirely unremembered in Alaskan annals is the summer stampede of 1898 from Fort Yukon to the bench diggings of Tarwater Hill.
Who knows in how many unremembered nations' literatures this has been the Castalian Fountain?
An incomprehensible resemblance to some unremembered voice in the niece; an unintelligible malady which kept the aunt secluded from public view; an extraordinary range of scientific cultivation in the uncle, associated with a coarseness and audacity of manner which by no means suggested the idea of a man engaged in studious pursuits -- were the members of this small family of three what they seemed on the surface of them?
For she was intent on another visioning--this time of her mother, who was also unremembered in the flesh.
Addressing forgetfulness, he asserts that unremembered information is not lost forever, just held in storage to be combined with other data and retrieved later.
"I had no epiphany, no singular revelation, no moment of truth, but a steady accumulation of a thousand slights, a thousand indignities, a thousand unremembered moments produced in me an anger, a rebelliousness, a desire to fight the system that imprisoned my people.
But all the women's faces have been cut out because in the familiar story of Kenya's independence, these women represent the unremembered heroes.
There is a memorable passage from satirist Evelyn Waugh's perhaps purposively unremembered political masterpiece "Black Mischief" (1932), in which Basil Seal, the chief Anglo architect of a modernization program in the fictional African island nation of Azania, passes a stark sentence on the democratically bereft principals of political modernity:
(12) As we look back on 1989, let us thus remember the year that produced moments of spectacular violence (in Beijing), equally spectacular nonviolence (in Berlin), and the multiple lines of historical storytelling a short segment of time can generate, including those that remain too often unseen and unremembered.
As I tell those who join my own leadership programme, most of us will sink like stones, unremembered, uncherished.
I want them to always know that their sacrifices do not go unnoticed, or unremembered. I thank God every day for the men and women who serve our country.