unrepented

unrepented

(ˌʌnrɪˈpɛntɪd)
adj
not repented of
References in periodicals archive ?
Preparedness means also that we are not living in sin and unrepented wrongdoings
Those concerned by his disinclination to reprove clear and unrepented wrongdoing should perhaps act toward him, at this early stage, as he has urged his flock to act toward the police: 'Push, inspire and not condemn.'
Lamentations accepts both the sovereignty of God and the righteous wrath of God, which is his justified reaction to persistent, unrepented sin.
In that talk, Robinson called for a substantive rethinking of church teaching on sexuality and also said Catholic sexual teachings have "fostered a belief in an incredibly angry God" who "would condemn a person to an eternity in hell for a single unrepented moment of deliberate pleasure arising from sexual desire."
(4) Furthermore, we come to realize that D'Annunzio's text is constructed and intended as a contrasting parallel between the sacred and the profane, for the conflict that arises in the novel is that of an unrepented sinner who is not concerned with the main reality in the relation of mortals to God, as in Saint Augustine, but rather with a justification of his transgressions towards his wife Giuliana.
Worshippers to serpents, lay sick If a worshipper was bitten, it was believed to be because that individual lacked faith, or had sin(s) unrepented. Few sought medical attention after being bitten.
judgement and feelings towards a similar, but unrepented free-
What is yet to be seen is whether the final episode will be an effective judgement day, or whether the motley crew''s crimes will go unrepented..
Richardson assures his readers that as soon as godly penitents identified their unrepented sins and "unfainedly humbled our selves for it under His hand, He returneth againe to our comfort." (60) In Greenham's sermon on Thessalonians 5:19, he depicts the elect individual's battles with doubt and unbelief as "purgatorie in this present lyfe." (61) But like purgatory, the battle is finite.
The scene worked, visually and linguistically: the red silk, "heavy" with King Hamlet's unconfessed and unrepented sins and his own death, shrouded Hamlet and "pull'd" him into his bloody inheritance; likewise, the scene "pull'd" the spectators into the story of this production--it exposed the pressure exercised by the past's authority over the present.
* that to die in unrepented sin results in a separation from God;
This meant that, under Spanish colonial rule, Inca women would be forbidden to exercise their formerly sacred roles of midwife, healer, and confessor -- this because all three involved mediating between the secular and the sacred, a function that, in the Christian faith, was only legitimate when performed by men; indeed, women's participation in such mediation, considered to be an integral part of Inca religion and a source of female prestige, was considered a sacrilege in Christianity, a mortal sin, which if unrepented would end in the loss of a woman's soul and her condemnation to hell.