unresistant


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unresistant

(ˌʌnrɪˈzɪstənt)
adj
1. not resistant or putting up a fight
2. (Medicine) med lacking immunity to a disease, bacteria, or virus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unresistant - (often followed by `to') likely to be affected withunresistant - (often followed by `to') likely to be affected with; "liable to diabetes"
susceptible - (often followed by `of' or `to') yielding readily to or capable of; "susceptible to colds"; "susceptible of proof"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Excessive defects in type 2 diabetic diseases cause insulin cells to become unresistant. As a result, the insulin signal channel is perturbed and thus, the absorption of glucose in tissues such as muscle is impaired [9].
These conventional seeds would keep pests unresistant to Bt corn as they would serve as food for insects such as corn borer.
Because it can easily evaporate after being applied, the chemical sometimes settles on neighboring fields planted with unresistant seeds.
However, my ethnographic fieldwork with the new middle classes in Ho Chi Minh City over the past decade leads me to suggest that many educated women remain unaware of or unresistant to government control of the print media and television broadcasts.
She visits the King in jail and finds him passively unresistant; she tracks down Master Liang causing him to marvel at her filiality, and he responds by going to see a general who is a proud benefactor of the opera--but he says that it is a local matter and out of his jurisdiction.
According to preliminary estimates, about 3.3 million people live in seismic unresistant houses accounting for 66% of the population.
the waft of approval, that unresistant seduction, a baby settled in the
While the poetic function finds its purest manifestation in poetry, yet without being confined to it, poetry is for Jakobson primarily (but not exclusively) a "figure of sound" (1960: 367): it contains musical elements which are unresistant to seeking a further expansion outside music.