unrest

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un·rest

 (ŭn-rĕst′, ŭn′rĕst′)
n.
1. An uneasy or troubled condition; unease or discontent: voter unrest over the scandal.
2. A condition of social disturbance, often involving demonstrations or rioting: "Superiors gave their officers carteblanche to quash unrest with indiscriminate force" (Neil Bascomb).

unrest

(ʌnˈrɛst)
n
1. a troubled or rebellious state of discontent
2. an uneasy or troubled state

un•rest

(ʌnˈrɛst)

n.
1. lack of rest; uneasiness.
2. disturbance or turmoil; agitation: political unrest.
[1300–50]
un•rest′ing, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unrest - a state of agitation or turbulent change or developmentunrest - a state of agitation or turbulent change or development; "the political ferment produced new leadership"; "social unrest"
Sturm und Drang, upheaval, turbulence - a state of violent disturbance and disorder (as in politics or social conditions generally); "the industrial revolution was a period of great turbulence"
2.unrest - a feeling of restless agitationunrest - a feeling of restless agitation  
agitation - the feeling of being agitated; not calm

unrest

noun discontent, rebellion, dissatisfaction, protest, turmoil, upheaval, strife, agitation, discord, disaffection, sedition, tumult, dissension The real danger is civil unrest in the east of the country.
discontent rest, peace, calm, tranquillity, contentment, stillness

unrest

noun
2. A state of uneasiness and usually resentment brewing to an eventual explosion:
Translations
قَلَق، إضْطِراب
nepokoj
uro
órói, ólga
nemieri
huzursuzlukrahatsızlık

unrest

[ʌnˈrest] N
1. (Pol) → malestar m; (= riots) → disturbios mpl
the unrest in the Congolos disturbios del Congo
2. (= unease) → malestar m, inquietud f

unrest

[ˌʌnˈrɛst] n
(social, civil strife)troubles mpl
(= dissatisfaction) → mécontentement m
unrest about sth → mécontentement à propos de qch, mécontentement au sujet de qch

unrest

nUnruhen pl; (= discontent)Unzufriedenheit f; there was unrest among the workersdie Arbeiter waren unzufrieden

unrest

[ʌnˈrɛst] n (disturbances) → agitazioni fpl

unrest

(anˈrest) noun
a state of trouble or discontent, especially among a group of people. political unrest.

unrest

n. desasosiego, inquietud; intranquilidad.
References in classic literature ?
"To Helen" first appeared in the 1831 volume, as did also "The Valley of Unrest" (as "The Valley Nis"), "Israfel," and one or two others of the youthful pieces.
There is no mistaking that sensation, so dismal, so tormenting and so subtle, so full of unhappiness and unrest. I could imagine no worse eternal punishment for evil seamen who die unrepentant upon the earthly sea than that their souls should be condemned to man the ghosts of disabled ships, drifting for ever across a ghostly and tempestuous ocean.
And at once awoke all my old unrest that John Barleycorn had put to sleep.
In short, the house in Saville Row, which must have been a very temple of disorder and unrest under the illustrious but dissipated Sheridan, was cosiness, comfort, and method idealised.
It is for this reason that a quietism is to be found in Chinese poetry ill appealing to the unrest of our day, and as dissimilar to our ideals of existence as the life of the planets is to that of the dark bodies whirling aimlessly through space.
In his hands sin suffered no dramatic punishment; it did not always show itself as unhappiness, in the personal sense, but it was always unrest, and without the hope of peace.
"Falk" shares with one other of my stories ("The Return" in the "Tales of Unrest" volume) the distinction of never having been serialized.
All his childhood and youth had been troubled by a vague unrest; he had never known what he wanted, but he had wanted something that he had hunted vainly for until he met Ruth.
Nor was the Doctor happier in his selection, when he told the old, ever new and curious story of the waning of a woman's love, seeking strange, new channels, only to return to its legitimate source after days of fierce unrest. It was one of the many little human documents which had been unfolded to him during his long career as a physician.
He has left for us a history of that struggle,* which perhaps better than any other makes us realize the unrest of the Scottish people, the anger, the fear, the indecision, with which they were filled.
In the palace about him seethed, all unknown to Gahan, a vast unrest. Warriors and chieftains pursued the duties of their vocations with dour faces, and little knots of them were collecting here and there and with frowns of anger discussing some subject that was uppermost in the minds of all.
It was a pain and an unrest; and it received easement only by the touch of the new god's presence.