unrevenged

unrevenged

(ˌʌnrɪˈvɛndʒd)
adj
1. not avenged
2. (Law) not having been made right through a just punishment
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Under his command, the Omahas obtained great character for military prowess, nor did he permit an insult or an injury to one of his tribe to pass unrevenged. The Pawnee republicans had inflicted a gross indignity on a favorite and distinguished Omaha brave.
And if you flatter yourself that I don't perceive it, you are a fool; and if you think I can be consoled by sweet words, you are an idiot: and if you fancy I'll suffer unrevenged, I'll convince you of the contrary, in a very little while!
They are taught, from infancy upward, to believe it a duty never to allow an injury to pass unrevenged; and nothing but the stronger claims of hospitality can guard one against their resentments where they have power.”
He said the children martyred in Peshawar school are the children of the entire nation and each and every drop of their blood would never go unrevenged.
Murdered, forgotten, unrevenged, incorrupt, immortal, many old friends were scattered throughout the dim hall."
As long as sword, fire, or poison may be hired, no traitor to my love shall live unrevenged. (1.2.1-7) (25) In Love's Metamorphosis (1588-90), a mythopastoral comedy that recalls both Peele's Arraignment and The Rare Triumphs, characters variously suffer the divine revenge of Ceres and Cupid.
if this unhallowed deed, If this inhuman and barbarous attempts, If this incomparable murder thus Of mine, but now no more my son, Shall unrevealed and unrevenged pass, How should we term your dealings to be just, If you unjustly deal with those that in your justice trust?
unlived life still longing to live, of unrevenged betrayal wild to wreak havoc.
My fine Oskar did not die an unrevenged death as the cut grass on the field of Morva.
Because he must be "above" private motives, Carlyle remains unrevenged until Levison decides to stand for Parliament in his district.
because they are not human" (116), he is insisting both that the memory of having been enslaved cannot be eradicated in him, and that, correlatively, one would finally have to believe "the Negro" not human--incapable even of memory--to imagine slaves might live unprotestingly with their enslavement, or let it pass unrevenged. At the same time, he is reminding Delano, with a pointedness the American seems not to notice, of the limitedness of his own sympathetic conjectures: "So far may even the best man err," Cereno says, "in judging the conduct of one with the recesses of whose condition he is not acquainted" (115).