unrevolutionary

unrevolutionary

(ˌʌnˌrɛvəˈluːʃənərɪ)
adj
not revolutionary, progressive, or radical
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
that i could altar the body's topology & not forget its former shell-- that i could unbecome with nail & steel without perishing in the crucifixion-- when i bleed i bleed soft as stone's ripple & it is tame, unrevolutionary in leak--that i could even witness myself outside of my self-- a stranger calls me militant, says smile for the picture, you look like you could kill someone like she forgot our gods razed temples before we wrote them into patient--for what is a god if not a mxn in the sky we crafted into our own image?
The HomePod was a late-to-market, unrevolutionary product trading on the Apple name.
As envisioned, it is most unrevolutionary and antipeople, a sheer monopolization of naked power that is despotic and self-righteous.
A modest, utterly unrevolutionary redistribution of wealth is required, alongside common sense measures like a real industrial policy, help for small businesses, more investment in the health service and much more investment in housing.
This was self-help of a decidedly unrevolutionary sort (although it could be just as violent) and neither these revolts nor uprisings on slave ships in the notorious Middle Passage had any larger impact on slavery.
Walker, William, Antiformalist, Unrevolutionary, Illiberal Milton: Political Prose, 1644-1660, Farnham, Ashgate, 2014; hardback; pp.
Seen from Lee's tight, autobiographical angle, Yecao looks decidedly unrevolutionary, neither wild nor free nor lively and growing.
In that sense, Girls of Riyadh can seem disappointingly unrevolutionary. But it's a striking expose of a social malaise, and it has launched hundreds of debates in a country where free expression is rare.
(138) Wasserstrom notes that even Malcolm X's call for human rights was "as unrevolutionary about the ends to be sought" as it was radical with respect to the means he advocated to get those rights.
In "The Birth of the Author," she collects textual, onomastic, and archaeological evidence to reach the unskeptical and unrevolutionary conclusion that Hesiod, the "nonelite farmer-poet" of Askra in Boeotia, author of the Theogony and the Works and Days, gives witness to the socioeconomic changes that occurred in Greece during the early seventh century BCE (88-127, 131).
With its emphasis on absolute obedience and the stamping out of individuality, Theravada Buddhism directly influenced the nightly "criticism and self-criticism" sessions in which peasants confessed their daily unrevolutionary acts and pointed out others' shortcomings, systematically breaking down all ties to the personal and the private.