unrhymed


Also found in: Thesaurus.

unrhymed

(ʌnˈraɪmd)
adj
(Poetry) (of lyrics, poetic verse, etc) not rhymed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unrhymed - not having rhyme; "writing unrhymed blank verse is like playing tennis without a net"
rhymed, rhyming, riming - having corresponding sounds especially terminal sounds; "rhymed verse"; "rhyming words"
Translations

unrhymed

adjungereimt
References in classic literature ?
Unrhymed iambic pentameters -- the most difficult kind of English verse to write acceptably; a kind, therefore, much affected by those who cannot acceptably write any kind.
The lines were unrhymed, such as a deaf person can make.
His poems, somewhat like reenactors, don different garments and come in different sizes and forms--there is a ghazal, a haiku, prose poems, sequence poems, poems written in unrhymed couplets and triplets, translations of Vietnamese poems, poems that include the Vietnamese language, and poems with indented lines.
1 article 10) and Jeff Grant responded soon after with some excellent letter-unit examples, adapted from earlier unrhymed palindromes (Word Ways, Vol.
"Bova" even has the marker of unrhymed dactylic line endings (which Pushkin would never use again).
In the original the first line of each stanza was rhymed with the first line of all the others, but this was too tight a straitjacket for me and so in my translation this line becomes a free, unrhymed line.
For short passages of poetry he has chosen rhymed couplets, but longer ones he has left unrhymed. Here and there a slight change of wording could have made for improved rhythm or maintained a constant linguistic register, but the results are at worst still pleasing and at best brilliant.
Any comforts Witch Wife affords are reinforced by the villanelle form, a versatile unrhymed version of which, here and in her recent chapbook Black Genealogy, has become for Petrosino what the sonnet was for Lowell, a form so natural for a poet's thinking that, without the added pinch of rhyme, it hardly feels like a form at all.
This effect is implied in the second version (for readers who notice and infer the missing rhyme "glass" beneath the unrhymed "mirror"), but it is only fully represented through the comparison of texts.
It may be long or short, rhymed or unrhymed, wise or foolish.
In a prime example of craftsmanship, Murphy composes "Niches" as a sonnet which is mostly unrhymed but sonnet-like in its lineation, a mixture of enjambed and end-stopped lines, and it also possesses the skeleton of an octave-sestet structure.
Having eschewed rhyme as inappropriate to Homer, Newman "found an unpleasant void" at the end of each line, which he then filled by adding "a double-ending to the verse, i.e., one (unaccented) syllable more than our Common Metre allows." (6) The result was a series of unrhymed verse-paragraphs, made of long lines of fifteen syllables and seven stresses, with a strong caesura in the middle, marked by the gap in the line.