unrideable

unrideable

(ʌnˈraɪdəbəl)
adj
(of a horse, etc) not able to be ridden; (of terrain) not able to be ridden over
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Wonder Wheelers will be bringing along weird and whacky bicycles, unicycles, penny farthings and lots more and people can try the unrideable bicycle challenge - steer one way and it goes the other!
Inside were customised Harleys which were paragons of form over function and mostly unrideable, and in a museum lovely old machines such as the legendary 1911 Silent Gray Fellow and a 1942 WLA, a sweet and gentle ride with its three-speed hand change and rocker clutch.
Track conditions on Saturday proved troublesome as two huge downpours left the track unrideable. But massive efforts were made by both volunteers and riders to rid the circuit of the standing water on both occasions meaning the meeting could be completed.
"I'm not going to say that section of the course was unrideable, because people did it.
All courses have unrideable sections, forcing riders to run with their bikes and jump wooden hurdles, making a steeplechase.
These bills are a treasure trove of long-forgotten acts: Lavanda's Feats with the Feet, Lou Lenny and her Unrideable Mule, Raydini the Gay Deceiver.
A total distance of 38 miles will be covered, four miles of which is unrideable with 5000 feet of climbing.
He said: "The frame of my bike buckled and it became unrideable. There was no way we could continue."
At the stewards' inquiry, Winston said the filly had been virtually unrideable at that point.
Harding (Paul Milnes/Bradford Olympic RC) was nearly two minutes clear, and the riders ended up having to run with his bike for a considerable distance due to heavy rain making the course unrideable even with top of the range mountain bikes.
The thawing frost made the going extremely slippery, forcing riders in all of the races to dismount and run several sections of course which were unrideable.
Jones, a scientist and columnist who has worked in academia, industry, and television, describes his theory of creativity, which is based on his challenges and successes, and examples of his scientific projects (such as chemical gardens in space and an unrideable bicycle), problems he encountered, and experiences he had.