unromanticized

(redirected from unromanticised)

unromanticized

(ˌʌnrəʊˈmæntɪˌsaɪzd) or

unromanticised

adj
not romantic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The reader is offered an unromanticised picture of the everyday living and working conditions of these pioneers.
There are various scenes depicted, often with the characters' features quite brutal and unromanticised in a familiar Rego style.
While many of us can not comprehend the enormity of genocide or the ramifications with which these children and communities will struggle for the rest of their lives, Rungjang is successful in fostering a realistic and unromanticised dialogue with the audience.
It celebrates humour and courage in the face of certain tragedy, and remains an important reminder of the horrors of war and the real, unromanticised heroes who fought it.
Based on the author's own experience of the Front and life in the trenches, it celebrates humour and courage in the face of certain tragedy, and remains an important reminder of the horrors of war and the real, unromanticised heroes who fought it.
Based on the author's own experience of the Front and life in the trenches, the production celebrates humour and courage in the face of certain tragedy, and remains an important reminder of the horrors of war and the real, unromanticised heroes who fought it.
Brutal, pacey and unromanticised, the movie tells the fact-led tale of 100-odd American frontliners dropped into Mogadishu to capture two top lieutenants of a prickly warlord, only to find themselves up against some seriously angry renegade Somalians.
There is a moment of heart-stopping apprehension but he's chosen to illuminate his feminist battle of the sexes fable with an unromanticised but warmly comic, humanistic light.
The surface texture is that of realism, as for example in the very unromanticised and quite successful battle scenes, but the structure is that of the romance, as the introductory note indicates.
Boudin's A Beach Near Trouville from 1895 shows a solitary soul walking along an unromanticised beach on a bright sunny day, rugged cliffs to the right.
Based on the author's own experience of the Front and life in the trenches, it celebrates humour and courage in the face of certain tragedy and remains an important reminder of the horrors of war and the real, unromanticised heroes who fought it.