unromanticized

unromanticized

(ˌʌnrəʊˈmæntɪˌsaɪzd) or

unromanticised

adj
not romantic
References in periodicals archive ?
As gritty, unromanticized tales of the American West go, In the Distance by Hernan Diaz ranks with classics like Thomas Berger's Little Big Man and Larry McMurtry's Lonesome Dove.
The people who first called the Arctic home relied on intimate knowledge of the natural setting to carry out what was, for them, normal, unromanticized, day-to-day life.
Is it spiritually realistic to aspire to encounter nature untamed, unpacified, and unromanticized, with all its ambiguities and its death-driven violence, as a gift from the giver of every good and perfect gift, as a tabernacle of the most high, and thereby to be able to embrace nature spiritually, as a world charged with the glory of God, overflowing with blessings, beauty and goodness?
Most daring, she used her nude body, unidealized, to tackle subjects few others would touch; first unromanticized female sexuality, then the reality and vulnerability of the aging woman.
Cooper's dedication is a snug fit for the nofrills directorial style of our favorite director, whose unromanticized take on the dehumanizing aspects of war sets his film apart from emotionally manipulative and ideologically onesided war dramas.
Something like a form of unromanticized love is involved when a person will do that for you.
A popular success, Bride stems from Desrochers' Master's thesis, conducted at York University, which combines history and creative writing to paint an unromanticized portrait of the lives of the files du roi before and after their arrival to New France in the late-seventeenth century.
Check out An Unromanticized Guide to Merging Advisory Firms on ThinkAdvisor.
depicts an unromanticized 19th century in which the girls are both hungry for freedom and at times too complacent to oppose their circumstances.
Focusing on the moment of his sister's agony, Kinnell's unromanticized vision of the final journey defines "Knowing death", its "pain" and "exhaustion", as "a fair price for consciousness".
But what to do when one's desire to supply clear, unromanticized accounts of what American Indians (or other non-Western subjects) see and think remains unrequited?