unsatiable


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unsatiable

(ʌnˈseɪʃəbəl)
adj
insatiable
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unsatiable - impossible to satisfy; "an insatiate appetite"; "an insatiable demand for old buildings to restore"; "his passion for work was unsatiable"
References in classic literature ?
He was a blessing to all the juvenile part of the neighbourhood, for in summer he was for ever forming parties to eat cold ham and chicken out of doors, and in winter his private balls were numerous enough for any young lady who was not suffering under the unsatiable appetite of fifteen.
Seeking to build out its portfolio, the Volkswagen brand is probing a flock of after being untypically flat-footed in responding to the auto sector's seemingly unsatiable demand for new crossovers,
Writing on behalf of the company of Merchant Adventurers in 1601, John Wheeler criticizes trading in Europe by Englishmen who are not of his company, saying they "show an exorbitant, and unsatiable desire, and greedines of gaine." Wheeler is arguing for regulated, monopolistic trade rather than "a dispersed, stragling, and promiscuous trade." (14) Wheelers eroticized language sounds more than a little like hypocritical Busy or sincere Overdo.
LIN Dan's hunger to win remains as unsatiable as ever.
But for Gentillet, Dioclesian's story was a unique, "strange" case well worth a closer look; a man by nature of "unsatiable ambition and covetousnesse of glorie," he had the makings of a tyrant yet proved singularly wise and restrained.
Wherin is shewed the great mallice and discimulation of a wicked woman, the unsatiable desire of filthie lust and the shamefull end of all murderers." (4) The title page offers a clear meaning for the Arden story, a meaning that above all condemns the malicious deceptiveness of a woman driven by "filthie lust." Now, Arden is not a tightly constructed play, and almost any briefly asserted moral would omit some possible implications of the story.
He was by his own admission possessed by an 'unsatiable coveting to exhaust all that should, or can be said upon every head'; and he also appears--despite his occasional smugness--to have been intensely aware of his own shortcomings (as well as those of others), and a man who took every opportunity to remedy these deficiencies.
His work-rate is unbelieveable and his appetite unsatiable