unsayable

un·say·a·ble

 (ŭn-sā′ə-bəl)
adj.
Not readily spoken or expressed: unsayable fears.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

unsayable

(ʌnˈseɪəbəl)
adj
too insulting, indecent, etc, to be said
n
say the unsayable to express an opinion thought to be too controversial to mention
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Is it any wonder that idiots like those lads at the bus stop now think it's ok to say the unsayable? But then, like a shaft of sunlight, you find a little hope.
For too long he has been treated as a quintessentially English unkempt Teddy bear with a gift for saying the unsayable. To borrow US writer Saleno Zito's estimation of Trump: "The press takes him literally, but not seriously; his supporters take him seriously, but not literally."
This was a truly brave essay, shattering dogmas with impeccable erudition and a gentle touch, paving the way for future scholars to think the unthinkable and say the unsayable in the name of protecting all children from medically unnecessary genital cutting.
It is a fact - and it should not be an unsayable one - that his conduct on the touchline prior to the incident wasn't appropriate for a football manager.
If poets are the keepers of the unsayable, then silence, not
At its most simple, it's the art of saying the unsayable, or really driving your message home, via the medium of an outfit that speaks volumes.
President Duterte is known to say the unsayable. He is also known to do the undoable.
With his acerbic wit, fierce intellect and caustic social commentary, the uncompromising American comic has become renowned for saying the unsayable. Here is a man who has joked about his own mother's self-administered euthanasia.
to death with cavernous eyes, a dun silence -- the quiet way God answers us -- embodying the unsayable each poet would want to write.
The third word in that triad of Unsayable Words is 'Ahmadi'.
In saying the unsayable against someone of such power and influence, they gave other victims the courage to speak out.
Across each of these themes, the aim is to lend voice to "the unruly energy of the unsayable" and, in doing so, let Kierkegaard's theological, spiritual, and philosophical provocation remain a living one for us today.