unscoured

unscoured

(ʌnˈskaʊəd)
adj
unclean; unscrubbed
References in periodicals archive ?
It had ceased to be imposed in England over a century before: "[N]o poor woman, in that country, has suffered under the edge of a law so barbarous, for the last century; like unscoured armor, it is hung up by the wall; like the law of witchcraft, it has remained unused." (246) The last time anyone tried to impose ducking in England, Chief Justice Holt rejected it on the ground that it would "only harden the criminal; and, if she were once ducked, she would scold all the days of her life." (247) Although two women in Pennsylvania were subjected to ducking toward the end of the eighteenth century, the James court refused to give any weight to these precedents because the judges who imposed them were not lawyers and did not understand the common law.
Impurities can account for thirty to seventy percent of unscoured fleece weight.
The ECHOs are a welcome reminder of home and no page is left unscoured from the sports coverage to the daily crossword.