unsexual

unsexual

(ʌnˈsɛkʃʊəl)
adj
not sexual
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
We had been friends, quite good friends; but never could I get beyond the same comradeship which I might have established with one of my fellow-reporters upon the Gazette,--perfectly frank, perfectly kindly, and perfectly unsexual. My instincts are all against a woman being too frank and at her ease with me.
It asks us, for instance, to consider our assumption that children are unsexual. Preceding the young Clara's accusation, she makes a disconcertingly adult pass at Lucas, and it's her wounded pride that sparks the whole sorry mess.
The numbers of female, male and unsexual samples were 59, 31 and 7 in spring and 67, 40 and 13 in summer, respectively.
This atmosphere for Lawrence is intense, transformative, and distinctly unsexual. The center of Pan-life for him becomes the espousal of practices, rituals, traditions, and--this above all--landscapes that animistically unite man and nature, and such bonding is dramatically integrated with the texture of the changing seasons.
He claimed this was unsexual, and fostered "a good male feeling" that inspired him.
The new arrangement is envisioned in the couple's sarcastically unsexual scene in a double bed, with hubby contentedly reading, glasses posed down on nose, while the missus lies with a towel wrapped around her head, face obscured by an eerie blue cosmetic mask.
He was often aided and abetted during the Hogmany Show by the 'eight wee bonnie lasses' a troupe of female dancers in slippers and diaphanous gowns who were strangely unsexual in that 'folk' kind of way.
"I was every bit as unsexual as Noam," she relates, "more so really, since my body--in which I was lodged like an ice cube in a furnace--never took over" (p.
They are "good girls," he concludes, "who send money to their parents." Western women are unavailable, unappetizing, unsexual, or just too much bloody trouble.
When it becomes clear finally that her abductor was doubly unsexual, a priest both elderly and celibate, we see the duplicity of this authorial gesture, in which Hilda is pruriently imagined as violated, but then presented as "proof' against what turns out to be only the weakest kind of threat, the "kindly custody of pious maidens, and ...