unsoldierly


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unsoldierly

(ʌnˈsəʊldʒəlɪ) or

unsoldierlike

adj
(Military) not befitting a soldier
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unsoldierly - not conforming to military standards; "unsoldierly posture"
nonmilitary, unmilitary - not associated with soldiers or the military; "unmilitary circles of government"; "fatigue duty involves nonmilitary labor"
Translations

unsoldierly

[ˈʌnˈsəʊldʒəlɪ] ADJindigno de un militar, impropio de un militar

unsoldierly

adjunsoldatisch
References in classic literature ?
There was something peculiar about it, quite unsoldierly, rather comic, but extremely attractive.
But let it be sword, lance, or bolt that strikes me down: for I should think it shame to die from an iron ball from the fire-crake or bombard or any such unsoldierly weapon, which is only fitted to scare babes with its foolish noise and smoke.
In a unsoldierly act by the Pak Army, the bodies of two of our soldiers in the patrol were mutilated.
In an unsoldierly act by the Pak Army the bodies of two of our soldiers in the patrol were mutilated,' the statement said, warning of an 'appropriate response'.
In an unsoldierly act by the Pak army, the bodies of two of our soldiers in the patrol were mutilated," Hindustan Times cited the Indian army as saying in a statement.
Then there was Greg Finney as Colonel Popoff, the ineffectual and unsoldierly commander of the Bulgarian army who bumbles through the piece as little in control of his womenfolk as his army.
Chemical warfare continued to be criticized as unsoldierly and antithetical to the laws of war in the aftermath of World War I and countries formed international covenants designed to limit the practice.
War-weary Brits saw the Americans as unsoldierly, extravagant.
July 1786, at 162, 164 (noting that Major General John Sullivan "hopes the privates will avoid a practice so unsoldierly, expensive and dangerous; all firing should be when troops are embodied, and such as the commanding-officer present may direct.
Despite Bierce's opening disclaimers regarding his identity as a writer, the text combines journalistic realism--"A few of [the men in camp] limped unsoldierly in deference to blistered feet"--with literary convention, as in the personification of the regimental flag in the description of the moments before the battle: "Presently the flag hanging limp and lifeless at headquarters was seen to lift itself spiritedly from the staff.