unspecialized


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un·spe·cial·ized

 (ŭn-spĕsh′ə-līzd′)
adj.
1. Without specialty or specialization.
2. Having no special function: unspecialized cells.

unspecialized

(ʌnˈspɛʃəˌlaɪzd) or

unspecialised

adj
not specialized
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unspecialized - not specialized or modified for a particular purpose or functionunspecialized - not specialized or modified for a particular purpose or function
general - applying to all or most members of a category or group; "the general public"; "general assistance"; "a general rule"; "in general terms"; "comprehensible to the general reader"
specialised, specialized - developed or designed for a special activity or function; "a specialized tool"
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the observed trends of increasing importance of rock crab and of decreasing importance of bivalves with increasing lobster size were consistent with the analyses of Scarratt (1980) and of Carter and Steele (1982b), and they suggest that lobsters are not simply opportunistic or unspecialized feeders (see Elner and Campbell, 1987).
A stem cell is unspecialized and can transform and multiply into specialized cells for the heart, brain, skin, and other tissues.
Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can renew themselves indefinitely and, under the right conditions, can develop into more mature cells with specialized functions.
For example, firms with specialized resources may find it more efficient to integrate vertically, whereas those with unspecialized resources may opt for outsourcing
The data presented here suggest that the unspecialized primary care gatekeeper model may have limited effectiveness in addressing the specialized service needs of people with mental illness, and perhaps of other populations with special needs as well.
The role of unspecialized pollinators in the reproductive success of Aldabran plants.
Someday the body will produce new skin from unspecialized cells called [ ] [ ].
My unspecialized experience has taken place in this "ambivalent scene of agency." More accurately, this scene has constituted my career, and continues to do so, I suppose, with the forthcoming book co-edited by someone (me) who does not speak Spanish and whose professional experience of Latin American popular culture has been limited to teaching I, Rigoberta Menchu, once.
These include access to equipment and specialized and unspecialized labor.
The fact of the matter is that African economies are too unspecialized to allow for econometric procedures, as are used in developed countries.
It is a pity, of course, that you should have to adjust your highly specialized faculties to our unspecialized ones.
As with farmers and other craftsmen in the unspecialized economy, the watchword of the printer was `safety first.'(11)